TIME AND TIDE WAIT FOR NONE


This story was published in the student edition of Deccan Herald on

18th December 2018

“ I will start studying from New Year”, “ I will clean up my room from the first of January”, “ I will continue with my Guitar classes from 2019”,  “ I  will  stop playing with the smart phone after I check all the new year greetings on Whatsapp”, “ I will not touch chocolates, cakes and chips after the New Year party.” Perhaps one of these or many more such lines are doing the rounds. Are you also making some such promise to yourself? The spirit of festive season can certainly have a very therapeutic and rejuvenating effect on people. Hence it is no wonder everyone is filled with the enthusiasm to make resolutions towards personal betterment. Well, there is nothing wrong with the zeal. After all new beginnings have a way of bringing positive changes and progress.

By the way, do you remember the story of “The Hare and the Tortoise”? Once the two animals were talking to each other and suddenly the hare started making fun of the tortoise for its slow gait. The tortoise laughed with the hare for a while but soon became very angry and upset. Therefore he told the hare that the two of them could enter a race which would decide the winner. The hare laughed at the idea for he was sure that he would win hands down. Nevertheless, he agreed to enter the race because he wanted to snub the tortoise for his overconfidence. On the day of the race, the two creatures set out from the start line. After a minute or two, the hare decided to rest for a while, and catch up later. The pleasant weather made him fall asleep. The tortoise noticed this, but did not stop in his tracks. He plodded on, in his naturally slow manner and reached the finish line a couple of hours later. In the meanwhile, the hare had fallen asleep, when he got up after several hours; he rubbed his eyes and scampered to the post, only to find the tortoise waiting for him at the Finish line. The hare felt very ashamed of his over confidence which made him lose out to someone who was obviously lots slower than him.

Though most of us know this story we fail to realise that we behave like the hare. We might have the right resources, guidance and support but we fail to make use of them to achieve our goals. Instead we waste our precious time on distractions which do us no good. We begin with a lot of eagerness and then it starts fading away. Therefore we are left with a lot of projects that are unfinished, promises that are broken and ideas that are not executed.

If you jog down the memory lane, you will remember that you too were bubbling over with the same kind of energy last December and perhaps earlier Decembers too! You began well, but most of you lost track of your goals like the hare because of several reasons. Some of your resolutions were forgotten or were found to be impractical and then there were some resolutions which bored you to tears and some others which could be done at a later date. If only you had shown some consistency in working on your resolutions like the tortoise, you could have succeeded in accomplishing your plans after all slow and steady wins the race!

Yet your attitude shows that you have neglected your own promises to yourself. If you don’t respect your own words then how can you expect others to do so?

You still have some time to redeem your promises before your start making new ones, make sure that you use it wisely and well for Time and Tide Wait for None!

 

 

 

STRENGTH OF KARMA


http://www.deccanheraldepaper.com/

The law of Karma makes it amply clear that we will most definitely experience the consequences of our actions.

Largely, people do not have any objections about harvesting the benefits of their good deeds. It is only when we go through a rough passage of life we cringe and cower at the thought of bearing the brunt of our misdeeds.

A level-headed person will understand that when one lands a bad bargain, he or she should hope for the best but be prepared for the worst. By doing so, at least the quotient of regret of not having tried enough to circumvent the problem can be done away with.

An episode from the Mahabharata documents this nugget of wisdom through the predicament of Parikshit, the king of Hastinapura. Once, the sovereign succumbed to unreasonable anger. He humiliated a reverent sage Shamik by garlanding him with the flaccid dead body of a snake.

The sage’s son Shringi, who was outraged by the king’s misdemeanor, cursed him to be dead in a week’s time by a snake bite. The petrified king realised that no amount of penitence could salvage him from the imminent death. Nevertheless he thought out the situation pragmatically.

He got a royal residence built on a tall tower and moved in. The food, drink and even the very air that he breathed were scanned before being permitted into the premises. Now it was customary for Brahmins to offer a fruit to the king. That day also, it was given to the king after the usual security check.

When the unsuspecting ruler cut open the fruit, a worm fell on the ground and grew up manifold. Takshaka, the king of snakes, metamorphosed himself into a tiny worm and had reclined in the heart of a lemon. Parikshit recognised Takshaka – and he fell dead when stung by the reptile and the prophecy was fulfilled.

Though Parikshit could not save himself, the fact remains that he left no stone unturned to protect his life. His approach is worthy of being emulated, for while it is sad to fail in one’s mission, it will be a shame and pity for not having tried to decimate the problem. If a righteous sovereign could not salvage himself from the consequences of his misdemeanor, we must think twice before we err consciously!

The Annual Vocabulary Workshop


The annual vocabulary workshop in English will be conducted by me this year also, please pass on the information to your local contacts

 

Contents:

Sixty games aimed at improving spellings, grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary will be played out by children of specific age brackets.

Score sheets will be maintained and the highest scorer of each day

will be rewarded.

Who is eligible?

JUNIOR Batch : Children between the age group of eight to ten.

SENIOR Batch : Children between the age group of eleven to thirteen.

When?

JUNIOR BATCH: From Monday 2nd April 2018

 to Wednesday 11th April 2018

SENIOR BATCH: From Monday 16th April 2018

 to Wednesday 25th April 2018

SENIOR  BATCH : From Monday 30th April 2018

 to Wednesday 9th May 2018

 Timings: 

10 am to 12 noon(on everyday including weekends)

Where?

65, ITI layout , Off new BEL road, Bangalore-560054

 How to contact ?

 Phone 080- 23603636

e-mail- radhaprathi@yahoo.co.in

When to Register?

As soon as you think you are interested in the camp. 

Naama Ramayanam sessions which are a combination of singing and storytelling will be conducted from Monday 2nd April 2018 to Monday 30th April 2018 between 4.30PM to 5.30PM everyday with the exception of weekends.

Venue: As given above

Contact details : As given above

 

 

 

Living in the Present


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/622259/living-present.html

There are many a time we put off doing or experiencing something for a later date. It may not always be money. We reserve our best clothing, crockery, candles, and accessories among other things hoping to use them at a premium occasion in our lives. Our usual excuse for doing so is usually a feeling that the present moment is not ideal for the activity.

A tale from the Panchatantra speaks about the dangers of being in the saving mode all the time. Once a hunter shot a wild boar, the wounded animal pounced on him and ripped his flesh apart. The agonised hunter was shocked to death by the boar before it breathed its last. A jackal which was passing by was beside himself with joy when he saw the corpses of the wild boar and the hunter. He realised that he need not go around scavenging for food for several days to come. He circled his newfound treasure and saw the bloodstained bow. He decided to save the bulk of meat for future. He proceeded to lick the life fluid off the bow and in the process triggered the arrow that was ready to be shot, right into his open mouth.

Almost immediately, the jackal fell dead beside his feast. The jackal died in his earnest bid to save the best for the coming days.

Those of us who are at least a couple of decades old must have realised that the precious moment that we have been waiting for may have come, but we may not have always had the time or the mind space to dig into our paraphernalia and fish out what had been saved for the red lettered day. It is also quite possible that our prized possession may not really rise to the occasion or we may have come across a better and a more contemporary and practical substitute to the stowed away goodies.

While it is pragmatic to save for a rainy day, it will do us a world of good to overcome our magpie syndrome and live each day to the fullest. It is said that yesterday is history, tomorrow is mystery but today is the present. It is impossible to discount the valuable content of the saying.

Brace Yourself For The Post Party Syndrome


http://ww

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/589106/brace-yourself-post-party-syndrome.html

Calm after the storm

The two-faced Roman god Janus is ready to usher in the new year, while earthlings are partying hard. What many of us do not know is that we are working ourselves into as state of frenzy in the name of unwinding. This is true of those who organise parties as well as those who attend them.

A lot of meticulous planning, precious time and hard-earned money is ploughed into these events by hoteliers and owners of restaurants, bars and pubs besides individuals. Painstakingly decorating the party space, arranging enough food and drinks to go around and organising entertainment programmes takes several months of hard work and networking. Needless to say, this puts a great strain on their nerves.

It’s easy to assume that the party hoppers are a jolly lot, but that is far from the truth. They, for their part, are stressed about what to wear, whose company to seek, how to fit in at the party and get home safely afterwards.

Back to the grind

While all the music, dancing and socialising is fun while it lasts, the morning after generally brings along a hangover or worse, depression and loneliness. The post-party syndrome can encapsulate a lot of issues. You might feel lazy, fatigued and reluctant to get on with your work and normal routine. The late nights, gorging on calorie-rich food and aerated or alcoholic drinks can take a toll on the intestines and the liver. The lack of sleep will affect your cognitive function.

While none of these are reasons to pass on the merriment, by taking a few smart measures, you can save yourself from the physical and emotional stress that is likely to bog you down.

Catch up on some sleep every now and then so that you’re not caught yawning in company during the party. Loss of sleep can be telling on the countenance and general health of the individual in the long run. You would do well to have plenty of salad, fruits and juices during the day to offset the heavy food that you might eat at night.

Following an exercise regime will help you burn off the calories you gained binge-eating and drinking over the past few weeks. It is wise to keep tab on the amount of liquor that you consume in order to avoid embarrassment, untoward incidents and accidents.

The emptiness you’re left with

Psychologists point out that people who throw or attend many parties could experience a sense of loss, emotional numbness and anxiety once the gala time is over. This usually happens because they might have run into people whom they no longer care for or simply wish to avoid. They might have lost track of important days in all the frenzy. Even as they pretend to be happy and confident, they might be upset and despondent.

Putting the past behind and learning to live in the moment is the way to deal with these painful emotions. New year parties are, after all, about ringing out the old and ringing in the new. When you run into someone you dislike or have complicated emotions for, flash an affable smile, offer a kind word and move on. Try to forgive and forget for your own peace of mind.

You must understand that anything that brings you happiness must be good and genuine for it to last long. Refrain from hypocrisy and try to be earnest in terms of behaviour and attitude. Good manners and courteous behaviour has never killed anyone. A dollop of unadulterated enthusiasm can spread chirpiness and good cheer all around.

If you think your emotional wounds are still raw or that you may not be able to handle nasty surprises, pre-empt the guest list. If it is not to your liking, excuse yourself from attending the party. This can save you a lot of trouble and unpleasantness.

The most telling sign of the post-party syndrome is the lacuna created by the sudden lack of activity, which could lead to boredom, frustration and irritability.

Once you understand that parties are for enjoyment, socialising and rejuvenating your spirits, you can spend the days after the party organising contact numbers and addresses for future use. You can redeem your promise about keeping in touch by sending flowers or cards to renew your friendship with those you like.

If you hear of good or bad things happening to those you care for, do not hesitate to pick up the phone and get talking. An unexpected friendly gesture can not only cheer them up but will also make you feel happy. Once you learn the art of coping with the post-party syndrome, you will find yourself looking forward to more such good times!

Time Used is Time Gained


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/530364/time-used-time-gained.html

When we look at the diaries of successful people, we will find that apart from being focused and working hard and passionately on their projects, they will also display a very sensible way of managing time. They could be multitasking which is considered to be the optimal way of saving time.
True, but then, one cannot really multitask all the time due to several constraints. Even if one is compelled to do one task at a time, if one follows the prescribed procedure then, it will be easier to complete the work efficiently and well.  Many a time, people think that speed is the key to accomplishment. However, that need not be necessarily true. Haste often makes waste. Even when the job on hand is a little complicated or even a mundane one, we tend to make mistakes when speed overtakes us.
At such times, repetition of the activity will result in not only loss of time, but may also result in shabby work.
Remember, slow and steady wins the race. Yet, the main culprit who keeps us from success happens to be procrastination.
How often have we not caught ourselves putting off our assignments or errands for another time or day? Have we also not realised that some odd jobs around our homes and offices never get done after we put them on the back burner.
This pattern also holds good for our long-term objectives. Sometimes, we put them off till they become a distant dream. When we turn around wondering what really happened, we will find that our penchant for dillydallying has left us behind.
An instance from the Ramayana highlights the importance of time in the best possible way.
Rama, the crown prince of Ayodhya, was sentenced to an exile of fourteen years to redeem the promise made by his father King Dasharatha to his Queen Kaikeyi.
Kausalya, the mother of Rama, was extremely upset about the turn of events. She tried to dissuade her son from going away. When she realised that Rama had no intention of obeying his father, she offered to go along with him to the forest.
When the Ikshavaku prince pointed out that her place was with Dasharatha, she came up with another caveat.
She could not possibly send his new bride princess Sita away with him. Rama patiently explained Sita’s stance on the matter. When Kausalya broke down inconsolably and uncontrollably, Rama told her gently but firmly that he wanted to leave for the forest immediately because for him time used was equivalent to time gained. He could return earlier if he left without procrastination!