The Four Pillars Of The Success Mantra


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Everybody wants success. However, success does not come to all and sun-dry. Success follows anyone who has the discipline, hard work, passion and perseverance to achieve his or her goal. A story from the Ramayana highlights the four pillars of the success mantra. King Sagara lost his ceremonial horse while conducting his Ashwamedha Yajna. He sent his sixty thousand sons after the horse, which was eventually found in sage Kapila’s hermitage.

The princes misconstrued the sage to be the thief. The enraged sage reduced them to ashes. Sagara’s grandson Anshuman who went in search of his uncles discovered the truth. Garuda the celestial bird advised Anshuman to liberate the souls of his kin by washing their ashes over with the waters of the celestial Ganga. Anshuman did as he was bid, but was unsu­ccessful, so was his son Dile­e­pa. His grandson Bhageeratha, decided that he should redeem the soul of his ancestors. He studied the reasons for the previous failures and realised that his forefathers were trying to row two boats simultaneously. Therefore he renounced his throne and set out to conduct a severe penance to Lord Brahm­a.

The pleased Lord said that he had no reservations about directing the river of gods to descend on earth. Nevertheless he was doubtful whether the earth had the power to bear her form­idable force. He told Iksha­v­a­ku king to request Lord Shiva to control the waters. Bhageeratha meditated on Shiva and arranged for the descent of Ganga. Little did Bhagee­r­a­tha expect Lord Shiva to lock the audacious waters in his matted locks. He humbly performed another penance and impressed upon Shiva to release Ganga to salvage the souls of his forefathers. Just when he thought that all his troubles were over Ganga managed to annoy sage Jahnu who drank her up in a fit of anger. The poor king pleaded with the sage to let go of Ganga and eventually led her to the nethe­r­world and carried out his mission. Any other person in his place would have given up, but not Bhageeratha. The sense of purpose of the fourth generation scion has been epitomised in the phrase Bhageeratha Prayathna which we will do well to emulate, if we hope to realise our most cherished dreams.

The Need To Overcome Rivalry


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Rat race is the order of the day. Everyone is rushing headlong to achieve the best in life in terms of money, power and materialistic assets. 

It is interesting to note that there is a certain pattern in which people compete with one another. People invariably tend to compare and contend with those close to them in terms of age, abilities and achievements. This syndrome of rivalry seems to be rampant in just about every conceivable field under the sun across time and space. People are always very conscious about someone who is a few notches higher them in their range of ability. In fact, this universal negative quality is what keeps the world going the way it is.

When one contemplates on this inevitable curse on human society, it is not difficult to see that nature has ordained it so in the scheme of things. Darwin’s theory of survival of the fittest revolves around this concept. A trip down our mythology reveals that the personality of the lord of gods, Indra, is no different. Devendra had it all. He was the king of very heavens and had power, wealth and influence over the cosmos. Yet, Indra never stopped feeling insecure about his position.

He always found ways and means to abort the penances and efforts of Rishis and mortal kings to excel themselves. A Vedic dictum says that any person who completed 100 Ashwamedha Yagnas successfully could claim the status of Indra.  The Yagna demanded discipline, consistent effort, military prowess and an undiluted sense of purpose in order to qualify for the highest post in creation. Apparently, Indra must have completed the arduous criteria to gain this coveted throne. Yet, these factors do not deter him from resorting to cheap tactics and guile to upset the endeavours of his potential adversary to safeguard his post.

If one hopes to rise above these petty feelings and stop feeling short-changed and jealous, he or she must adopt the attitude of working sincerely towards the goal from respective stations in life without fear or favour as suggested by lord Krishna. If each of us does our bit, the big picture will materialise magnificently.

Evolution of Hospitality Industry


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When the conservative Indians promoted the concept of eating outside their homes by patronising the exceptional culinary skills of the Udupi cooks, little did they realise that they were paving the way for a mighty food and hospitality industry in the coming decades.

Though the industry began as an amateur, it slowly developed into a state-of-the-art restaurant over a period of time, giving it a professional touch.

Soon, high profile hospitality industry like the star-rated hotels, swanky resorts, restaurants and VIP guest houses felt the need for trained professionals who could carry out their duties with a flair of international sensibilities.

The Government of India realised these needs and encouraged various universities to include a course in Hotel Management in the 1980s.

Now, most colleges offer good infrastructure and they complement classroom academics with practical lessons to enrich the knowledge of the students. However, the results have not been exactly spectacular, thus far.

While some colleges are affiliated to the Indian universities, many have tied up with foreign universities for short term diploma courses and certificate courses, which boost the profile of the student in the international scene.

Initially a 4-year undergraduate course called BHM (Bachelor of Hotel Management) was introduced with relevant subjects touching on areas like language, accounts, housekeeping and related skills necessary for the job. The teaching faculty at hotel management colleges said that though the course content matched international standards, unfortunately, the takers of the courses were the students who were much below the average mark. A survey reveals that the situation has not altered much, even to this day.

The reasons are obvious – students with low marks or candidates who may have discontinued education are the usual takers. Naturally, they do not do well in academics because of lack of basic knowledge coupled with a sense of low self-esteem.

They are also perhaps acutely aware of the fact that the society at large is not really well-known for honouring jobs as hoteliers, waiters or housekeepers even in star-rated hotels. This is also one of the main reasons why there was a glaring absence of girl students in these classes in the initial years. The scene has changed a little over the years. Now there is a steady trickle of young women who are ready to give it a shot.

Despite the low popularity level, it is a fact that, the course has landed several diligent students in enviable positions in many star-rated hotels.

Success stories

These success stories have also encouraged the partially-educated staff working in private and ordinary eateries to take up the course to upgrade themselves as professionally qualified personnel who can move on to greener pastures.

Then there are enterprising hoteliers who introduce grooming classes and train their staff in communication and soft skills to enhance the quality of the services in the hotel. Such trained workers are indirectly motivated to clear their intermediate examinations privately and take up a hotel management course.

The reason for such careful cushioning lies in the realms of detrimental attrition which leaves the industry almost always in a state of uncertainty.

The day is not far when the growing demand of the industry will attract more and more and even meritorious students to consider hotel management courses as a career option.

Hotel management colleges can consider this situation to be a cue and gear up to cater to the needs of the industry and give it the much needed facelift. Globalisation and enhanced spending capacity of Indians has paved the way for a boom in the hospitality industry in a big way. Campus recruitments are becoming the order of the day.

Big names in the industry across the globe are ready to absorb and pay fancy salaries and positions construing to the talents and qualifications of the candidates. In fact the market has expanded over the past couple of years. Developing marine businesses like cruise liners and ships are recruiting personnel by the dozens. Event management teams and trip organisers are always looking for trained staff.

Certainly, the situation cannot get any better. Earnest students of hotel management can be rest assured that they can land themselves on the velvet if they work diligently towards their goal.

Stop Not Till The Goal Is Reached


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These days schools, colleges, business houses, corporate, government and public sector organisations religiously arrange elaborate orientation sessions at the start of a new project, semester or term. These sessions aim at making  newcomers comfortable with their forthcoming years in the varsity. In other words these assemblies reiterate the message found in Upanishads – Uththishta, Jaagratha, Praapaya Varannibodhita.

This dictum has been beautifully put across in the story of a young boy called Nachiketa. It is said the boy knocked the door of Yama in a bid to fulfil his father’s words who said he would give away his son Nachiketa to the lord of Death in a fit of anger. Yama, generally feared by the mortal world, was pleasantly surprised to see the earnest young man at his doorstep and engaged him in conversation. Yama was even more surprised when the young boy wanted to know about the secret of Death that has been puzzling humankind ever since the beginning of time. Yama tried to talk the boy around and away from his questions. Nachiketa was very clear about his goals. He wanted supreme knowledge hitherto unknown to anyone, including the very gods. Yama was reluctant to disclose the niche knowledge to the boy because he was not very sure if the question rose out of sheer curiosity or was it a genuine thirst for knowledge. Therefore, he tempted Nachiketa with worldly riches like having a hundred noble sons and grandsons who would live to be a hundred years, as many milch cows, elephants, horses, gold, wealth, land or anything else that he fancied. Surprisingly the boy was not tempted by any of them. He refused the worldly bounties of Preyas and opted for Shreyas, which is eternal knowledge. Eventually, Yama felt obliged to satiate the boy’s inquisitiveness.

Vivekananda once said if he had a dozen students like Nachiketa, he could turn the minds of Indians towards exploring themselves and arriving at discovering the Brahman.
At a practical level, spiritual awakening would automatically help people upgrade themselves physically, economically and politically.

It is interesting to note that Vivekananda was actually echoing the Upanishadic concept when he said, “Arise, awake stop not till your goal is reached.”

Restart If Essential


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Radha Prathi, March 8, 2016:

Planning is definitely a prerequisite to lead a routine normal life or achieve monumental success. Yet there are times when we find that our best laid plans are reduced to shambles. More often than not, we realise that we have digressed from the chosen path because we have succumbed to distractions. We seldom realise that our cautiousness and alertness about impending dangers are teased by unforeseen circumstances or fate.

Logical analysis of the failure may or may not reveal the chink in the armour. When we are in such situations, we must not hesitate to restart our pet project from scratch. Sooner or later, a plausible solution will manifest itself in the form of an opportunity or a person who will lead us out of the dark tunnel.

An episode from the Ramayana puts across this point ever so well. Sugriva the king of Kishkinda divided his army into four parts. He sent them in the four directions of the earth in search of Rama’s spouse Sita. The southern direction was captained by Hanuman, his trusted minister. Angada the crown prince of Kishkinda  who was under his able leadership, set out enthusiastically to fulfill the mission. His youth, energy and penchant for exploring new facets of life, led him and his simian associates into a Shangrila of sorts. He was carried away by the illusory pleasures and comforts that the region had to offer and forgot his goal.

Hanuman his mentor and guide, saw through the ploy of the enchantress Swayamprabha the mistress of the cave and discussed the gravity of the situation with her. The lady considered the application of Maruthi and decided to release the army from her deceitful clutches.

Though Angada was happy to surface back to normalcy, he was depressed because he had swerved from the chosen path. He felt insecure and afraid of facing the wrath of his uncle Sugriva and the exiled prince Rama. He contemplated  suicide till he was counselled otherwise by Hanuman. Angada’s confused mind gained clarity and he launched on the search project all over again with renewed energy and fresh hopes. That his team succeeded this time around lies in the realms of exercising patience and implementing the assignment all over again.

Old Habits Die Hard


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Radha Prathi, Feb 5, 2016

There are two ways to approach a failure. It can be treated as the stepping stone of success or simply avoided because when a person is once bitten, he is twice shy. The response to failure should be based on the goal of the undertaken project.

If one works on an assignment which will make a difference to oneself or the society around, giving the task a second or third try can prove worthwhile. On the other hand, if the activity happens to stem from one’s Achilles’ heel, it can prove to be detrimental.

An incident from the Mahabharata illustrates how a person can tumble into a bottomless pit by failing to use discretion or self control. When Yudhishtira established Indraprastha, his cousins, the Kauravas, could not contain their jealousy. Shakuni devised a bout of gambling that would relieve the Pandavas of all their possessions.

The invitation for a game of dice was extended to Yudhishtira.

The Pandavas smelt something fishy. They wanted to turn down the invitation. Yet, Yudhishtira was reluctant to refuse the invite for two reasons. The protocol of his times demanded him to accept the invitation. If he had genuinely wanted to circumvent the gambling session, he could have done so. All the same Yudhishtira decided to go ahead because he had a weakness for playing dice. He then lost his kingdom, power, brothers and even his wife one after another at the game of dice.

He was subjected to abject humiliation and was tied down by his Dharma to be of any earthly help to his family. Even the attempt to violate Draupadi’s modesty was averted because of the divine intervention of Krishna. The lord made Dhritarashtra realise his blunder. Yudhishtira was restored with all that he lost. Matters seemed to have settled till Shakuni arranged to invite Yudhishtira for a friendly game of dice again in the guise of smoothing matters. Once again Yudhishtira had the option to reject the call.

The recent set of events could have served as reason enough to shy away from gambling. Nevertheless, Yudhishtira succumbed to his weakness in the name of honouring royal etiquette. He placed wagers on the lines of the last round of games. The only difference was the absence of ignominy. Consequently Yudhishtira was stripped of his property and power and was sent on exile. Interestingly, years later, Yudhishtira often played his favourite game with King Virata when in incognito.

His habit almost gave him away once he started bleeding when struck by the king; Draupadi in disguise had to hasten to prevent his dripping blood from touching the ground.

If we fail to wean away from detrimental addictions, they can land us in irreversible situations in life. Indeed, old habits die hard.

Varsities Must Help Biz Aspirants


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S Radha Prathi, February 3, 2016

The need for startups has slowly emerged after long periods of procrastination and hibernation. Though India has come miles from the time of acute unemployment, we still find the problem is still rampant because we find an indefinite number of educated people who are not usefully employed. 

While a number of causes like over-population, under-employment, lack of infrastructure, inferior work skills and such other factors can be attributed to explain this situation, there are certain other factors that have to be taken into consideration.

For instance, a candidate who has completed his master degree in Business Administration from a reputed institution like Harvard, Yale or IIM, lands himself on velvet at the end of the course while his counterpart from a lesser known institution is usually treated as a lesser mortal in the job market. The secret of the successful candidate lies in the kind of training he receives besides hardcore academics.

This is one of the main reasons why the institution that offers these post graduate degrees should incorporate value-added courses along with the main one. Value-creation through informed entrepreneurship is aimed at helping potential entrepreneurs to explore their strengths and weaknesses long before they enter the market.

Colleges have been known to encourage students to put forth their business plan which are evaluated in earnest by the Moguls in the field in the hope of inspiring entrepreneurship among the enthusiastic students.

Besides, they have placement cells and entrepreneurial cells in the premises of their campuses in order to help their students to launch themselves into the big bad world on their own feet. Then there are internship programmes that expose the students to the realities of the serving as practical lessons.

Colleges regularly take students out on industrial visits, expose them to expert guest lectures and work on their corporate communication skills besides formal academic training.
The colleges have expert in-house corporate consultants who organise student internship with reputed companies, sketch business plans and even help the students to execute their plans if it is found feasible.

Students are helped to zoom up small businesses to international levels by actively interacting among themselves and also with their guides and guest faculty. There are also several instances of students who have networked with business hotspots abroad and have carved a niche for themselves in the world of business.

Market needs

Hardcore academicians feel that too much exposure to the practical realities may distract students from the main purpose of gaining insight into the crux of the subject and moulding near ideal situations.

Yet the flipside of the matter validates the viewpoint that this step is necessary to bridge the gap between the academic cream and the dregs. It especially helps the students in the middle category to launch their businesses. This measure stands in partially for the government which cannot apparently provide jobs to all of them.

Moreover, if students were conversant with the market needs even as they were studying their chances of their impending success becomes more ascertained in a world riddled with rat races.

The measures taken by these institutions are playing a great role in channelising the young post graduates of management into rewarding. Most students studying in these colleges disclosed that the fees was certainly on the higher side but the perquisites they received from the college kind of compensated the price.

Some students from humble economic backgrounds choose to study in these expensive colleges only because they are assured jobs or will be given the due support to start their businesses. Perhaps it is this sense of anxiousness in the student community which has led to the mushrooming of a large range of on-campus placement and business cells in almost every private college.

Apparently, the need of the hour happens to be to motivate the budding business entrepreneurs into taking a plunge into the free market economy and emerge as winners by meeting the specific industry requirement. In the present day scenario, it has become the social responsibility of colleges to stretch their roles as career guides.

The business management courses have a greater responsibility to structure and pad in such a way that it steps up the desire to continue family businesses, start their own businesses and also enhance the employability quotient of students. This is the only way in which we can work towards economic up gradation and protect students from becoming pessimistic, desperate and demoralised by unemployment.