Gift for teacher? Classroom Discipline


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S Radha Prathi, Sep 5 2017, 0:08 IST

If teachers were asked what they would consider the best teacher’s day gift, the answer would be an unanimous chorus — classroom discipline!

Well, that happens to be the harsh truth. An average classroom in any school across urban India is almost always in a state of chaos. The teacher-student ratio is unwieldy in most. Under the circumstances, a conscientious teacher has to also double up as the bad cop, usher the students to step in mentally, not just physically, into the classroom. Healthy classroom practices like interactions, discussions and debates on the subject of study is often replaced with pontification, which has almost become a mandatory feature in the lives of teachers. Seldom can they do much else, because the law of the land forbids them from using the cane.

Most teaching staff are ashamed or afraid to rope in the help of colleagues, seniors or the head of the institutions because they do not want to show themselves to be weak or helpless. Besides, they do not want to jeopardise their chances of getting an increment by showing themselves to be lacking in class control skills. The students, for their part, ranging from primary school to the undergraduate levels seem to find it extremely difficult to sit still in the class and focus on what is being taught. Their attention span seems to be consistently declining year after year. They seem to have collectively traded the art of listening for the art of merely hearing that serves no purpose.

Such being the case, teachers have to often repeat themselves to reach out to everyone in the audience. In the process, a sense of repetition and redundancy sets in in the ones that got it the very first time. They become restless till the teacher takes the lesson forward but only after another round of disciplining. When this exercise becomes repetitive, it can get tiresome for both the students and the teacher. Precious classroom time is spent in shepherding students individually or in little groups into a state of silence before continuing with the lesson. Over a period of time, both parties get familiar with the pattern and play it out like clockwork to the point of frustration.

When teachers bare their hearts out on the subject, they are told categorically that “content is king” and the conduct of the teacher is the benchmark in a classroom. While that may be true, even experienced and passionate teachers who do know their subject and carry themselves with dignity are finding it difficult to handle disruptive behaviour. All the same, teachers agree that kids should have their fun and freedom as long as they do not constantly disrupt the classroom. They also vouch for the fact that the young are perfectly nice alone; it is only when they get together they become unmanageable.

It is time for us to unravel this conundrum. The restiveness stems from the environment the child comes from. The pressure to do well and realise the dreams of their parents has pinned them down. The gadgets they use and the amateurish exposure they get to various subjects on the internet make them feel that they know it all. The junk foods they consume, the sedentary lives they lead and the assorted pollutions they have to deal with have rendered them weak. Their preference to play with gadgets than with siblings or friends has made them strangers to empathy. The stress and strife of modern life is taking a toll on the children.

If we hope to salvage the future of our children, we must work on these issues on a war-footing. Remember, the family is the first school and the mother is the first teacher. Parents should make it their own imperative to spend quality time with children no matter what their age. Children who hail from sensible, ethical and loving homes will reflect those qualities.

Having well behaved students can prove to be a tremendous boost to a passionate teacher’s morale and her capacity to teach. Precious class hours can be channelised to sow the seeds of knowledge, nurture analytical thinking, and help children blossom into responsible, intelligent and considerate individuals. When teaching becomes a fulfilling and pleasant experience, a teacher can make a world of difference to the taught. When that happens, every day will be Teacher’s Day!

Serendipity in Seri


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Once, a couple of us were walking through a boulder-strewn path in the Himalayas. What began as a light drizzle at the head of our trek turned into a steady shower. There was no going back, because the tents we left behind were being dismantled.

While they could be erected again with a little effort , a couple of early birds in our group had already forged ahead an hour ago. We could not possibly leave them in the lurch by staying back. So, we decided to brave the inclement weather towards Seri Valley — our destination.

The obstacle-riddled path appeared to be more challenging when we had to cross a moraine, some newly formed streams and a little stretch of ice. The continuous rain and the dipping temperature proved to be quite a menace.

A slip here and a fall there amid wiping the water off the spectacles slowed me down. Benumbed hands failed to feel the little icicles falling all over and around us. The colourful and beautiful flowers that bordered our path at times had to be sadly ignored because personal comfort appeared to be more important than “stopping by to smell the flowers.”

Conversation almost came to a standstill with exceptions when we had to seek one another’s help. Gusts of cold wind blew about; we trudged along cold, wet and hungry. When it became increasingly difficult, we sighted a frail little open yellow tent among the rocks. Our escort prompted us to seek shelter there till the storm passed.

We found a lone shepherd huddled in blankets in the tiny tent. He ushered us in without a word. He shared his humble bed and let us use it, though we were drenched to our very bones. Just when I thought that his cup of mercy had overflowed, he allowed us to build a fire with his precious little stock of firewood.

A couple of hours passed. He answered our many queries but asked no questions of us. His body language did not display resentment, so we stayed on. The rains subsided. It was time to move on. We thanked him profusely for the hospitality. He nodded and asked us to reach our camp before the next spell of rains set in.

Some experiences in life do have a wonderful way of tweaking our path and make us reflect on existential questions. He seemed to be the essence of Sanghajeevi (social being) for Lokasangraha (betterment of the world). I simply could not stop thinking of experiencing serendipity in the wilderness.

Feast on Festival Delights -Seedai


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Radha Prathi Aug 12 2017, 0:28 IST

Radha Prathi gives us some lip-smacking seedai recipes for the festive occasion.

No Indian festival can be complete without offering the choicest of sweets and savouries to our deities. Krishna Janmashtami takes the cake as our populace from different part of the country have come up with their creative and unique recipes which they think will please their lord the most. The Vaishnavites of Southern India and the Tamilian population in particular indulge baby Krishna with a scrumptious crispy dish called the Seedai. These little round marble like delicacies have been always been made during the festival. The making of these snacks take some time, effort and patience for each ingredient has to be processed differently.

 

Vella seedai or Sweet Seedai

Ingredients:

Rice flour 2 small cups

Wash the raw rice under running water, spread it on a clean piece of cloth and grind it into fine flour when it still retains the last bit of moisture. Then roast the flour till it loses its moisture and allow the flour to cool before putting it to use.

Urad dal flour 1 table spoon

Roast the Urad dal before grinding it into flour.

Grated coconut 1 small cup

Ghee 1 table spoon

Melt the ghee before adding it t the dough

Jaggery  1 ½ cups

Sesame seeds 1 table spoon

Cardamom 4

Cloves 2

Dry ginger powder

Nutmeg 1/2

Roast the white sesame seeds till they are a golden brown

Salt ½ teaspoon

Oil/ ghee ½ litre for frying

Procedure:

  • Roast the Cardamom, Cloves, Dry ginger powder and Nutmeg and grind them into a fine powder.
  • You must make syrup of the jaggery in the given manner. Take a large pan, pour one litre of water into it and bring it to a boil. Add the crushed jaggery to the water and keep stirring it till it melts completely. Keep stirring the mixture till it condenses to a semi liquid form. You will know that your syrup is ready when your jaggery drops as strings from your ladle. You must turn off the heat before the jaggery starts caramelising.
  • Even when the jaggery syrup is hot, toss in the rice flour, urad dal flour, ghee, powder of the spices, sesame seeds and salt.
  • Mix the ingredients well, add hot water little by little and knead the mixture into fine dough so that there are no lumps.
  • The dough should be firm like the dough of bread or roti.
  • Apply rice flour on your palms and pinch out a little dough and roll it into a cylinder which has the thickness of two of your fingers put together.
  • Pinch out the dough from this cylindrical dough and roll them into large marbles. Note make sure that you do not press the dough or shape them into perfectly smooth balls for they will tend to burst when they are being fried. It is also mandatory for all the balls in each batch to be of more or less the same size for the to fry deeply and well.
  • Spread a clean cloth or use a clean tray which can be used for making the seedai.
  • It will be convenient to make little batches of seven to ten seedais depending on the size of your pan.
  • You can roll out all the batches before frying them.
  • Heat oil. Once the oil starts emanating fumes, drop the seedais allow them to cook well in the oil, till they turn a golden brown.
  • Make sure that the heat is consistent on a low fire till they are fried completely.
  • Remove them from the oil and drop them on a plate laden with fresh tissues so that the excess oil can be absorbed.
  • You can fry a batch of them in ghee for improved taste and longevity. When you remove them from the ghee and drop them on a plate filled partially with wheat flour laden so that the excess ghee can be absorbed. The flour can be later on used to make dough for rotis.
  • Once the seedais cool down they can be stored in an airtight container and used from time to time as a snack.

Here is a little tip to keep your savouries fresh and crisp till the last one is used up. Drop in a two cardamoms, a few peppercorns and a piece of edible camphor in the container in which you store them.

 

 

Uppu or Salted  and spicy Seedai

 Ingredients:

Rice flour 2 small cups

Wash the raw rice under running water, spread it on a clean piece of cloth and grind it into fine flour when it still retains the last bit of moisture. Then roast the flour till it loses its moisture and allow the flour to cool before putting it to use.

Urad dal flour 1 table spoon

Roast the Urad dal before grinding it into flour.

Grated coconut 1 small cup

Ghee 1 table spoon

Melt the ghee before adding it to the dough

Channa Dal 1 small cup

Soak the Channa dal for an hour or so before adding it to the dough.

Sesame seeds 1 table spoon

Roast the white sesame seeds till they are a golden brown

Red Chilli powder 1tablespoon

Roast ten to twelve red chillies without using oil and grind it immediately into a fine powder.

Hing  ½ inch of the solidified variety

Soak the hing in hot water before adding it  to the dough.

Water

Use cold water for obtaining best results.

Oil ½ litre for frying

Toss a pinch of tamarind into the oil, just in case you are using coconut oil to prevent it from boiling over while frying.

Procedure:

  • Take a large pan and toss in the rice flour, urad dal flour, soaked channa dal, ghee, red chilli powder, sesame seeds and salt.
  • Mix the ingredients well, when dry.
  • Add cold water little by little and knead the mixture into a fine dough so that there are no lumps and the dough is firm.
  • Apply rice flour on your palms and pinch out a little dough and roll it into a cylinder which has the thickness of your little finger.
  • Pinch out the dough from this cylindrical dough and roll them into little marbles. Note make sure that you do not press the dough or shape them into perfectly smooth balls for they will tend to burst when they are being fried.
  • Spread a clean cloth or use a clean tray which can be used for making the seedai.
  • It will be convenient to make little batches of thirty to forty seedais depending on the size of your pan. It is also mandatory for all the balls in each batch to be of more or less the same size for the to fry deeply and well.
  • You can roll out all the batches before frying them.
  • Heat oil. Once the oil starts emanating fumes, drop the seedais allow them to cook well in the oil, till they turn a golden brown. Keep the heat high on a low flame for the best results.
  • Remove them from the oil and drop them on a plate laden with fresh tissues so that the excess oil can be absorbed.
  • Once the seedais cool down they can be stored in an airtight container and used from time to time as a snack.

Here is a little tip to keep your savouries fresh and crisp till the last one is used up. Drop in a  piece of hing in the container in which you store them.

 

 Rava seedai

Ingredients:

Semolina 2 small cups

Roast the semolina on a slow fire till it is a golden brown. Adding a teaspoon of ghee while roasting it can make your snack crispier.

Ghee 1 table spoon

Melt the ghee before adding it to the dough

Pepper  powder 1tablespoon

Roast the peppers without using oil and grind it immediately into a fine powder.

Hing  ½ inch of the solidified variety

Soak the hing in hot water before adding it  to the dough.

Oil ½ litre for frying

Toss a pinch of tamarind into the salt to prevent it from boiling over while frying.

 Procedure:

  • Take a large pan and toss in semolina, ghee, hing, pepper powder, and salt.
  • Mix the ingredients well, when dry.
  • Add boiling hot water little by little and knead the mixture into a fine dough so that there are no lumps and knead it well till the dough becomes firm.
  • Apply rice flour on your palms and pinch out a little dough and roll it into a cylinder which has the thickness of your little finger.
  • Pinch out the dough from this cylindrical dough and roll them into little marbles. Note make sure that you do not press the dough or shape them into perfectly smooth balls for they will tend to burst when they are being fried.
  • Spread a clean cloth or use a clean tray which can be used for making the seedai.
  • It will be convenient to make little batches of thirty to forty seedais depending on the size of your pan. It is also mandatory for all the balls in each batch to be of more or less the same size for the to fry deeply and well.
  • You can roll out all the batches before frying them.
  • Heat oil. Once the oil starts emanating fumes, drop the seedais allow them to cook well in the oil, till they turn a golden brown.
  • Remove them from the oil and drop them on a plate laden with fresh tissues so that the excess oil can be absorbed.
  • Once the seedais cool down they can be stored in an airtight container and used from time to time as a snack.

Here is a little tip to keep your savouries fresh and crisp till the last one is used up. Drop in a  piece of hing in the container in which you store them.

NOTE : you can alter the taste of the rava seedai by flavouring it with red chilli powder instead of pepper.

Red Chilli powder 1tablespoon

Roast ten to twelve red chillies without using oil and grind it immediately into a fine powder.

Vennai seedai or Butter  Seedai

 Ingredients:

Rice flour 2 small cups

Wash the raw rice under running water, spread it on a clean piece of cloth and grind it into fine flour when it still retains the last bit of moisture. Then roast the flour till it loses its moisture and allow the flour to cool before putting it to use.

Urad dal flour 1 table spoon

Roast the Urad dal before grinding it into flour.

Fresh butter 1 table spoon

Melt the ghee before adding it to the dough

Hing  ½ inch of the solidified variety

Soak the hing in hot water before adding it to the dough.

Water

Use cold water for obtaining best results.

Ghee ½ litre for frying

Procedure:

  • Take a large pan and toss in the rice flour, urad dal flour, hing and salt.
  • Mix the ingredients well, when dry.
  • Add water little by little and knead the mixture into a fine dough so that there are no lumps.
  • Apply rice flour on your palms and pinch out a little dough and roll it into a cylinder which has the thickness of your little finger.
  • Pinch out the dough from this cylindrical dough and roll them into little marbles. Note make sure that you do not press the dough or shape them into perfectly smooth balls for they will tend to burst when they are being fried.
  • Spread a clean cloth or use a clean tray which can be used for making the seedai.
  • It will be convenient to make little batches of thirty to forty seedais depending on the size of your pan. It is also mandatory for all the balls in each batch to be of more or less the same size for the to fry deeply and well.
  • You can roll out all the batches before frying them.
  • Heat Ghee. Once the ghee starts emanating fumes, drop the seedais allow them to cook well in the oil, till they turn a golden brown.
  • Remove them from the ghee and drop them on a plate filled partially with wheat flour laden so that the excess ghee can be absorbed. The flour can be later on used to make dough for rotis.
  • Once the seedais cool down they can be stored in a airtight container and used from time to time as a snack.

Here is a little tip to keep your savouries fresh and crisp till the last one is used up. Drop in a  piece of hing in the container in which you store them.

NOTE

Since the shape of the dish has the propensity to choke when accidently swallowed by little children, our tradition always makes one third of the portion of the dough in the form of a cheepi (that which can be sucked). The same dough is kneaded lightly into little thick sticks and fried so that they can be given to very small children.

 

 

Green Building for a Better Future


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Every creature on earth worth its salt has carved a niche for itself in some portion of the earth by way of shelter to see them through the inclemency of extreme weather conditions. Such being the case, can man, the most intelligent creation of them all, be left behind?

Archaeological surveys across the globe have revealed that ever since the evolution of man, he has felt and acknowledged the need to be sheltered from extreme conditions exuded by natural elements. Natural caves chosen as residence by the Paleolithic man had all the makings of a rudimentary home. Gradually, he gleaned know-how from the natural life around him and learned to build secure liveable homes deriving his sources from nature.

We have come a long way since then. Today we have the know-how to build state of the art buildings with every possible facility under the sun. Yet there is much to be desired in terms of planning and having equal accessibility to these conveniences. Startling realities of life like congestion and pollution are wreaking havoc especially in Indian cities.

Alarming urbanisation on the one hand and the need for cost effective housing on the other is pressurising architects and builders alike to construct homes for just about everyone who chooses to live in the cities. Every prospective house owner dreams of having a sleek, functional aesthetic contemporary home that is reinforced with strength sourced from premium housing material at an affordable price.

The expectations of the public appear to be reasonable and the builders are only too eager to fulfil them but in the process. Hence, homes are built all over the place without really ploughing through the pros and cons of the issue. The housing sector is riddled with chaotic posers from environmental, economic and ethical issues. There are a plethora of other related aspects that need to be sorted out.

It is high time man realised that global warming across the world is not a coffee table topic of the “eco-friendly lot” anymore; it is a serious issue that needs to be reckoned with. Conservation of natural resources and abstinence from using non-biodegradable materials should become the sovereign duty of each and everyone who walks the planet earth.

This does not mean that man does not have the right to enjoy his life, build his home or do it up the way it pleases his aesthetic sense. Yet if man remembers the words from the “Good Book” he will understand that “Charity begins at home.”

Dignity of labour
Home builders, owners and users should realise that the strength of eco-friendly architecture can go a long way in replenishing or at least sustaining the natural resources to a large extent. For starters, we can circumvent the use of extensive machines in the building industry and rely upon skills of people, thereby attempting to revive dignity of labour besides empowering labourers economically.

Eco-friendly ideas span across several possibilities like building materials, construc-tion technology, attitudes towards workers, alternative lifestyle, passive solar cooling, embedded energy, localising the act and such others. No construction can have all these possibilities explored in one, but may adopt as many ideas as possible towards a greener future.

Using natural building material tempered with technology can prove not only to be cost effective but can revive several traditional time-tested building techniques by master artisans across India.

If this measure is taken seriously by architects, builders, interior decorators and prospective house owners alike, we will not only be supporting the livelihood of several masons and artisans but will indirectly promote and rejuvenate a dying art which is eco-friendly and the need of today.

These days, space is a constraint in growing cities hence most people have to compromise on translating the home of their dreams on terra firma and look forward to realising them in one of the floors of a high rise building. Strong and light materials will prove to be invaluable companions in providing more floor space and letting in light and air in good measure.

When we take practical realties into consideration, it is obvious that one cannot turn the wheel of time back and undo all the damage that has already be­en wreaked on earth yet, if the decisions we make while constructing or renovating homes can be examined philanthropically, it automatically becomes our duty to switch over to eco-friendly building material.

Raising Our Daughters the Right Way


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Bringing up: In a world full of judgements and suspicions, we have to raise our daughters with the correct set of values.

Under the wings...Under the wings…

Archana insisted on homeschooling her twin daughters as she had nightmares about admitting her children to the kindergarten in the metropolis soon after being bombarded by stories of lurking paedophiles around learning centres. Vandana gave up her lucrative job because she wanted to be at home when her daughter arrived home at noon. She had heard horrific stories of children being administered sleeping pills in their milk at daycare centres. Meera laughingly calls herself the designated chauffeur of her kids because she is always driving them in and out of one class or another.

Lakshmi opted for voluntary retirement just when it was her turn to get promoted, to ensure that she could fund her daughter’s dream to study abroad. Suma, a qualified lawyer, decided to be a stay-at-home mother because she believed in the dictum “Better safe than sorry” (All names have been changed to respect their identities.)

What these young and not-so-young mothers have done for the apples of their eyes, is not unusual. Each of these mothers and several tens and thousands of their kind have been doing more or less the same thing in various capacities. No, they are not cynical or paranoid, they are just being careful. With reason too. We live in a world which is riddled by multiple standards, inequalities in every aspect, uncertainties and incomprehensible expectations. Hence, leading a normal life believing in the intrinsic goodness of fellow human beings is out of the question.

Now is the time for us to rethink our parenting strategies, especially where it concerns the girl child. After all, parenting is called an art and not without reason. We must prepare our daughters to hope for the best but be prepared for the worst right from the moment they arrive in our lives. Here are a few areas that need
serious looking into:

Physical well-being
A taste for a nutritious balanced diet punctuated with some form of exercise should be introduced right from the beginning. When a healthy diet and a physical regime coupled with personal hygiene become a habit, immunity levels will soar, and keeping healthy will not prove to be a challenge. Teaching them martial arts or sports or simply involving them in everyday household chores will help them build stamina and can prove to be a boon in times of need.

Modesty & morality
Modesty and morality should not be mixed up. Remember, being prudish can cost them dearly. They must be taught the difference between good touch and bad touch. Girls should be taught not to be ashamed of their bodies or the changes they undergo. They should be encouraged to spell out their doubts and fears. It will do well to sensitise girls to the fact that the outside world will judge them by the clothes, accessories and the makeup they wear, though character cannot be determined by the length of their sleeves or necklines.

Subjects like virginity, rape, honour, domestic violence, honour killings need not be drawing room conversations, if it feels delicate. All the same, there is no point in sweeping the subjects under the carpet and looking the other way when they do crop up.

Using such topics as a launchpad to clear the cobwebs of a growing mind can go a long way in preventing girls from becoming judgmental. The knowledge will also cushion them to some extent, if they are unfortunate victims of such
circumstances.

Coping with new age trends
Many girls go through a phase in life when they get their facial or body parts pierced or tattooed, when they colour, curl or straighten their hair or undergo cosmetic surgery on a whim and regret it later.

Depriving permission outright may not go well with everyone. So, the stubborn ones can be encouraged to try the temporary option and then if they really care for the fashion, then they can be told to take the plunge.

Being feminine
Girls should be taught to appreciate and enjoy their feminine side. Since we live in a diabolical world, girls can be groomed to be soft-spoken and delicate damsels. So, they should be clearly told that they must not hesitate to protect themselves even if it means biting and kicking the molester on the face, or very simply amplifying their lung power.

Expanding the mind
Encourage your girls to have friends, go out and mingle. While dating or having a relationship is not wrong, they should also be taught when and where to draw the line and how to say no firmly when they feel uncomfortable. Writing a diary or pouring their concerns to an agony aunt can help them ease their tensions. Ask them to be careful about what they post and with whom they share on their social media sites, especially their pictures. With so much cyber crime going on, one can never be too careful.

Evaluation of Evaluators


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The citizens in the world of academics are only too aware that there are wheels within wheels. Students, their parents and their teachers know that the path to progress is many tiered.

Students have to imbibe what they are taught, customise their knowledge to cater to the needs of the examination system and then await results post evaluation. The process appears to be ancient, normal and warranted as far as one can see.

The evaluators take over from the point the students finish their examinations, and it is this factor that most students and parents are apprehensive about. Realisation dawns on them that the ball is no longer in their court; their results are in the hands of unknown evaluators especially when they take up the board or university examinations.

The routine of nervously scanning through the Internet and news channels for the forthcoming results can be quite draining to all examinees, no matter to which age group they belong. Though the law of cause and effect is well known to be proportionate, it is apparently not applicable in our desi educational system to a large extent.

It appears that the shloka from the Bhagavad Gita which says, “Karmanye Vaadhika-raste, Maa Phaleshu kadachana,” which means “You have the right only to do your duty, but never anticipate the fruit for your deeds” is applicable to the students who complete their examinations. That is why we find students spending their vacation with fingers crossed for the outcome of their performance.

The anomalies in the realms of examination results can range from appearing late to appearing wrong. Though all boards and universities do have channels for re-totalling, revaluation, availing copies of answer scripts and even provisions to appear in the court of law, the number of mistakes that happen have not come down considerably.

It is understandable that to err is human. After all, it is the teachers who correct answer scripts. It is quite possible that they could have made an error or two out of sheer oversight or fatigue. Considering the fact that they are also willing to recheck and award rightful scores when approached through proper channels also speaks for the fairness and the transparent nature of the system.

All the same, the students find it difficult to repose faith in the system because many of them have been unsuspecting victims of sheer apathy and convoluted processes which have scorched their spirits and singed their opportunities.

Shortage of evaluators

When the matter is scrutinised from the teachers’ point of view, many factors that seem to justify their slipshod job come under the magnifying glass.

Firstly, there is an acute shortage of evaluators. Since most teaching jobs are offered by private educational institutions, they have a floating population of teaching staff.

Teachers resign their jobs at the end of the academic year in search of greener pastures and are sometimes willing to take an unpaid holiday while in the process of switching jobs. This trend automatically shows a large dip in the number of evaluators during the annual academic break.
Teachers who are hired on a contract basis for the occasion try to earn a little extra money by hurrying through the answer scripts.

The teaching faculty with secure jobs usually decides to put up their price during this season and prefers to go on strikes and dharnas. They feel that it is probably the best time to make their presence and value known. The harsh truth is that teachers are the lowest paid educated class in society.

It is a fact that teachers are burdened with the onus of wading through a sea of answer scripts without respite and the remuneration mostly does not match with the effort put in.

Apart from that, the evaluators are answerable to the chief examiner as well as the students if they have bungled in the process of correcting an answer script or totalling the marks obtained. They can be even sued in the court of law for not taking up their responsibility seriously.

The callousness in assessment of students can be averted to a large extent if knowledgeable and conscientious teachers are chosen for the job consciously. In addition, they should be given their due importance, respect and remuneration. They will be only too delighted and diligent to carry out the responsibilities bestowed upon them. And then, the rest assured students can enjoy happy holidays.

Colour me Yellow


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Image for representation.Image for representation.

It is interesting to note that every household in our country uses haldi or turmeric powder in their food. This wonder rhizome has been used in vegetarian, non-vegetarian and vegan cooking in the powdered form for centuries now.

The condiment is an integral part of our culture, a mandatory ingredient in our cuisine, an effective curative, and is also used as a cosmetic. Its subtle spiciness can add a zing to just about any curry, pulses, rice, and even baked goodies like buns and breads. The secret of getting the colour and flavour of turmeric right is simple. The haldi powder should be tossed in just before the oil or ghee, which is used for seasoning, starts smoking. If you add it too soon, the turmeric will leave its raw smell behind, and later than the precise moment will lend shades of brown instead of the desired yellow, and will give out a burnt smell.

Turmeric is usually avoided in sweets. The exception to the rule being that a pinch of haldi added to boiling milk, while making milk sweets to lend it a pale creamy colour. If you are planning to add the herb in milk for therapeutic purposes, it is best that you put it right at the end, just before serving.

It is advisable to add sundried rhizomes instead of the powdered form while making masalas for rasam, sambhar, bisibele bath or vangibath at home. It will make a tangible difference to the taste, colour and potency of homemade masalas.

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