Cornerstone of the Medical Industry


Published in EDUVERSE- JNANADEGULA special supplement of DECCAN HERALD on Saturday 26th May 2018

By S. RADHA PRATHI

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” A question asked at various times usually elicits interesting answers from young people.  A global survey shows that almost all kids express a desire to become a doctor at some point of time during their childhood. Well, if wishes were horses —– well, they are not!

One needs to study very hard and score admirably well to get into a medical course. Then it is a life of complete dedication with little or no respite. Everybody who aspires to become a doctor may not be able to, due to various reasons. Yet this does not mean that you have to discard the idea completely. You can serve in the medical field, if you explore your abilities in one of the numerous paramedical fields.

All of us are aware that modern and efficient medical practices swear by relevant tests and sometimes squarely depend on them to diagnose elusive ailments. The diagnostic industry deals with hundreds of tests based on various parameters executed from latest equipment. An astronomical figure of qualified manpower is essential to run this industry on well oiled wheels. The laboratory technicians, chemists, and analysts form the backbone of this set up.

If you want to be a fruitful contributor to this sector, you can choose to study a paramedical course of your choice. There are nearly one thousand five hundred colleges and hospitals across our sub continent that offers their degree, diploma and certificate courses to students who have completed their board examinations at the tenth and twelfth standards. Karnataka tops the list with the maximum number of this facility.

A GLIMPSE OF SOME OF THE DEGREE COURSES

B.Sc. in Operation Theatre Technology

B.Sc. in X Ray Technology

B.Sc. in Radiography and Medical Imaging

B.Sc. in Dialysis Technology

B.Sc. in Medical Record Technology

B.Sc. in Medical Laboratory Technology

B.Sc. in Ophthalmic Technology

Bachelor of Occupational Therapy

Bachelor of Physiotherapy

B.Sc. in Speech Therapy

BASLP Course

B.Sc. in Audiology

B.Sc. in Anaesthesia Technology

B.Sc. in Audiology and Speech Therapy

B.Sc. in Optometry

A GLIMPSE OF SOME OF THE DIPLOMA COURSES

Diploma in Operation Theatre Technology (DOTT)

Diploma in X Ray Technology

Diploma in Radiography and Medical Imaging

Diploma in ECG Technology

Diploma in Dialysis Technology

Diploma in Medical Record Technology

Diploma in Medical Laboratory Technology (DMLT)

Diploma in Ophthalmic Technology

Diploma in Physiotherapy

Diploma in Anaesthesia Technology

Diploma in Nursing Care Assistant

Diploma in Sanitary Inspector

Diploma in Hearing Language and Speech (DHLS)

Diploma in Dental Hygienist

Diploma in Audiometry Technician

Diploma in Audiology and Speech Therapy

WHO IS ELIGIBLE?

Tenth pass with first division.

Twelfth pass with first division and  Physics, Chemistry and Biology as your optional subjects.

DURATION OF THE COURSE

Diploma: 2 Years

Degree: 3 Years

NOTE: Students who have completed their tenth standards will have to do a mandatory bridge course in Physics, Chemistry and Biology for one year.

So also, Twelfth passed students who do not measure up or clear the eligibility test will have to take up the bridge course.

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

You can contribute to the medical field effectively if you train yourself in one of the three main areas of the paramedical zone.

If you have the ability understand and appreciate chemistry and biology you could become a laboratory technician who studies samples of bodily fluids, tissues and bones and generate reports.

If you have a technical bent of mind, you could learn how to operate the various machines and equipment around the hospital and help patients to use these machines properly and arrive at results.

If you have always wanted to be beavering away at the operation theatre or the Intensive care unit, you can avail training to operate the equipment there and conduct superfast tests as and when necessary.

 

Once a student completes the degree or diploma course successfully he or she is likely to be placed immediately in decently well paid job in a relevant laboratory or hospital.

FUTURE PROSPECTS

It is said that your qualification is the passport to your first job. If you want to climb the ladder, you will do well to study related subjects one by one as short term Certificate courses. Your hands on experience and constant exposure to the variegated and ever expanding paramedical field can make you the laboratory chief at some point in your career. Besides, the satisfaction of having helped out innumerable doctors and patients as the cornerstone of the medical industry can feel insurmountable.

 

 

ANIMATION DISAMBIGUATED


Published in EDUVERSE- JNANADEGULA special supplement of DECCAN HERALD on Saturday 26th May 2018

By S. RADHA PRATHI

Well, the students of the present day can dare to dream and transform their passions into their professions. If you are the kind who has not spent a day of your life without watching animated cartoons and similar shows, and have ruminated on the details and have mentally added variations to the show, you might as well consider making a career out of it.

Those of you who have creativity in your beings and have completed their board exams at the tenth and twelfth standards and have a flair for drawing can explore the world of animation through structured study. Once the basic requisites are ticked, you will need to check on your working knowledge of English, that is because, it happens to be the medium of study. There are several institutes in all the major cities of India like Mumbai, Chennai, Bangalore, Hyderabad and Trivandrum have emerged as the country’s major animation hubs which cater to the specific needs of these students for a period of six months to eighteen months depending on the module chosen by the student.

If you want to do a full-fledged undergraduate course, well, options also exist both in our country. Students have to attend a basic entrance test that checks their English language skills and arithmetical ability. A group discussion round evaluates their ability to think differently and creativity. The candidates who clear these rounds are admitted to the course.

Students who join the course will be led through the fundamental aspects of animation like using computers, drawing, sketching, model making and film making. They will be exposed to the history of the subjects and worldwide samples of classical and innovative animation. Slowly and surely the students will be taught and guided through several projects both theoretically and practically till they become industry ready.

Animation techniques are incredibly varied and difficult to                       categorize. Techniques are often related or combined. Hence the project guide of the individual student or the group takes up the responsibility of going that extra mile to help any new technique that the student may like to experiment with.

At the end of even the shortest course the institutes make sure that the students are familiar with the basic concepts of animation by making each student submit a project in place of exams. This frees prospective employers of these students of anxiety because the fundamentals imbibed during the course will help them to learn any new technique that they may have to use later on while on the job.

It is interesting to note that these students are picked up by experts and moguls in the field well before the completion of their courses as assistants and interns.

The world has realised that India has yet another talent for animation and its rich history culture and mythology has a lot more in store for the world than the eye can see. The runaway success of animated shows of Chota Bheem, Hanuman, Tenali Raman and Krishna among others has rejuvenated a renewed interest in India.  The Indian films with their special effects have not been missed by the discerning eye of the connoisseurs of the art either. This global recognition has led several Indian entrepreneurs to make mileage of the situation and as a result we have several reputed institutes like, MAAC, Arena, ANTS, Animaster, Toon School which have carved a niche for themselves in a rather short period.

Most good schools of Animation have a state of the art infrastructure, with an ultra modern production theatre with the latest equipment. The fact that the titans of the industry like Walt Disney, Imax, Warner Brothers and Sony are signing up huge contracts with Indian animation companies speaks in volumes of the impending boom in the industry.

The time has come when it has become essential for parents and teachers to analyse the latent potential of children who fill up the last pages of notebooks, their desks, the walls in their arms distance and any other canvass within their reach with sketches and doodles of incomprehensible characters. Perhaps it is time to analyse the minds that expend undue interest in cartoon shows and animated games with renewed interest and awaken the budding animation expert in them.

Multimedia in Animation:

Animation has brought many imaginary characters and stories to life. From Mickey Mouse’s endearing antics to Lara Croft’s edge-of-the-seat adventures, generations have grown up admiring this magic. In India alone, 300.000* professionals by 2008 are expected to be employed in the animation Industry. Animation Application Areas include Entertainment (Movies, Television). Business (Marketing Demos, Product Promotions), Sales (Presentations), Education (CBTs/WBTs), Tourism (Kiosks), Publishing (Graphics & Printing), Web Design, Virtual Reality for Simulations in Defense, Engineering. Advertising (Commercials, Print Ads), Interiors and Fashion Design.

  • “Animation is the rapid display of a sequence of images of 2-D artwork or model positions in order to create an illusion of movement.” In other words drawings and sketches are mobilised using technology to give it the feel of movement.
  • Students are given a lot of practice in drawing and sketching which is technically known as 2D skills. As the student progresses he or she is introduced into skills of visualizing and mastering 3D Animation, besides learning Character Design and Morphing.

 

 

 

Gift for teacher? Classroom Discipline


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/631432/gift-teacher-classroom-discipline.html

S Radha Prathi, Sep 5 2017, 0:08 IST

If teachers were asked what they would consider the best teacher’s day gift, the answer would be an unanimous chorus — classroom discipline!

Well, that happens to be the harsh truth. An average classroom in any school across urban India is almost always in a state of chaos. The teacher-student ratio is unwieldy in most. Under the circumstances, a conscientious teacher has to also double up as the bad cop, usher the students to step in mentally, not just physically, into the classroom. Healthy classroom practices like interactions, discussions and debates on the subject of study is often replaced with pontification, which has almost become a mandatory feature in the lives of teachers. Seldom can they do much else, because the law of the land forbids them from using the cane.

Most teaching staff are ashamed or afraid to rope in the help of colleagues, seniors or the head of the institutions because they do not want to show themselves to be weak or helpless. Besides, they do not want to jeopardise their chances of getting an increment by showing themselves to be lacking in class control skills. The students, for their part, ranging from primary school to the undergraduate levels seem to find it extremely difficult to sit still in the class and focus on what is being taught. Their attention span seems to be consistently declining year after year. They seem to have collectively traded the art of listening for the art of merely hearing that serves no purpose.

Such being the case, teachers have to often repeat themselves to reach out to everyone in the audience. In the process, a sense of repetition and redundancy sets in in the ones that got it the very first time. They become restless till the teacher takes the lesson forward but only after another round of disciplining. When this exercise becomes repetitive, it can get tiresome for both the students and the teacher. Precious classroom time is spent in shepherding students individually or in little groups into a state of silence before continuing with the lesson. Over a period of time, both parties get familiar with the pattern and play it out like clockwork to the point of frustration.

When teachers bare their hearts out on the subject, they are told categorically that “content is king” and the conduct of the teacher is the benchmark in a classroom. While that may be true, even experienced and passionate teachers who do know their subject and carry themselves with dignity are finding it difficult to handle disruptive behaviour. All the same, teachers agree that kids should have their fun and freedom as long as they do not constantly disrupt the classroom. They also vouch for the fact that the young are perfectly nice alone; it is only when they get together they become unmanageable.

It is time for us to unravel this conundrum. The restiveness stems from the environment the child comes from. The pressure to do well and realise the dreams of their parents has pinned them down. The gadgets they use and the amateurish exposure they get to various subjects on the internet make them feel that they know it all. The junk foods they consume, the sedentary lives they lead and the assorted pollutions they have to deal with have rendered them weak. Their preference to play with gadgets than with siblings or friends has made them strangers to empathy. The stress and strife of modern life is taking a toll on the children.

If we hope to salvage the future of our children, we must work on these issues on a war-footing. Remember, the family is the first school and the mother is the first teacher. Parents should make it their own imperative to spend quality time with children no matter what their age. Children who hail from sensible, ethical and loving homes will reflect those qualities.

Having well behaved students can prove to be a tremendous boost to a passionate teacher’s morale and her capacity to teach. Precious class hours can be channelised to sow the seeds of knowledge, nurture analytical thinking, and help children blossom into responsible, intelligent and considerate individuals. When teaching becomes a fulfilling and pleasant experience, a teacher can make a world of difference to the taught. When that happens, every day will be Teacher’s Day!

Living in the Present


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/622259/living-present.html

There are many a time we put off doing or experiencing something for a later date. It may not always be money. We reserve our best clothing, crockery, candles, and accessories among other things hoping to use them at a premium occasion in our lives. Our usual excuse for doing so is usually a feeling that the present moment is not ideal for the activity.

A tale from the Panchatantra speaks about the dangers of being in the saving mode all the time. Once a hunter shot a wild boar, the wounded animal pounced on him and ripped his flesh apart. The agonised hunter was shocked to death by the boar before it breathed its last. A jackal which was passing by was beside himself with joy when he saw the corpses of the wild boar and the hunter. He realised that he need not go around scavenging for food for several days to come. He circled his newfound treasure and saw the bloodstained bow. He decided to save the bulk of meat for future. He proceeded to lick the life fluid off the bow and in the process triggered the arrow that was ready to be shot, right into his open mouth.

Almost immediately, the jackal fell dead beside his feast. The jackal died in his earnest bid to save the best for the coming days.

Those of us who are at least a couple of decades old must have realised that the precious moment that we have been waiting for may have come, but we may not have always had the time or the mind space to dig into our paraphernalia and fish out what had been saved for the red lettered day. It is also quite possible that our prized possession may not really rise to the occasion or we may have come across a better and a more contemporary and practical substitute to the stowed away goodies.

While it is pragmatic to save for a rainy day, it will do us a world of good to overcome our magpie syndrome and live each day to the fullest. It is said that yesterday is history, tomorrow is mystery but today is the present. It is impossible to discount the valuable content of the saying.

Outsourcing is the Word


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/584479/outsourcings-word.html

Everything we ever want is available to us just at a click of a button, well almost everything. The things that cannot be achieved directly by technology can be outsourced for a price tag.

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