“Education ” By Question Banks


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/639810/education-question-banks.html

We are in the middle of the academic year. Students are busy taking periodic tests and midterm examinations based on the portions completed. Their answer scripts are being evaluated and assessed. Parents are being apprised of their ward’s performance.

Teachers’ meetings are being conducted to analyse their inputs and involvement in their responsibilities.

Everything seems to be going on like clockwork — just the way it should. Or, is it just a mirage? Perhaps this is the right time of the year for the parent, student and teacher to do a reality check.

Most schools have revision sessions before tests and examinations. They generate a question bank of sorts. The children are told directly or indirectly to concentrate on the revision sessions.

Parents and tuition teachers help the children out with the preparation. Most pupils get thorough with the “necessary portions” and score well. The tests and later on examinations are taken and evaluated — well, you know the drill.

While the process seems natural and harmless, it can turn out to be a quite a negative influence. It can uproot the fundamental aim of learning and education. Young students are being led by the nose to take up tests which prove to be a test of memory rather than understanding.

The very schools which claim to give holistic education shrink even the prescribed syllabus so that the students are not strained to look beyond a few questions.

Limited reading

Reading textbooks, ancillary reading material, referring to class notes are all relegated to the backburner because they do not count as “test portions”.

The learning that can be evinced from group study, working out varied problems, reference works are increasingly becoming non-existent because extensive reading or learning need not be displayed in answer papers.

The young learners cannot be blamed for wearing blinders because they are made to wear them by their teachers. When we look at the problem from the tutors’ point of view, it appears that they are shackled by several constraints. They are expected to cater to unwieldy numbers which makes it almost impossible for them to correct notebooks sincerely.

Then they have to live up to the expectations of the management and deliver cent per cent results as far as possible. When their increments and sometimes their employment depend on the results they deliver, they find it convenient to create “question banks”. This way they hope to step up the level of the results.

Multiple choice papers

The parents for their part do not really seem to mind this new infusion into the system right from primary school because their accountability comes down considerably. Sometimes, schools also opt for multiple choice question paper models partially or completely to make it easier for evaluation.

This method not only encourages blind guessing among students, but also conveniently circumvents the need to comprehend, work out or articulate their thoughts. The net result of this phenomenon precipitates as a mockery of education. No one is any wiser at the end of the day though everyone, the students, parents and teachers have gone through the exercise.

Today, we live in a world where education has been systematised. Learners go through the process of education in a set pattern and emerge as ‘educated’ people at various levels.

Where will all this spoon-feeding and holding hands lead them in the long run of life? Will their education stand them in good stead? Will they be in a position to think out of the box and handle unforeseen circumstances in life?

Can they come up with original or creative solutions to deal with problems? Will they employ just means to achieve their ends? How will they compare with their peer group across the globe? Will their accomplishments fill the lacunae that exist in the world?

The concept of “Question banks” was introduced at the university level, to help examinees to focus after browsing through an exhaustive material. To introduce the same, while shaping minds in their formative years in schools, amounts to committing intellectual suicide.

It is time to break this pattern and pay attention to learning for learning’s sake so that we can pave the way to developing inquisitive, fertile minds that are willing to go that extra mile before arriving at answers!

Evaluation of Evaluators


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/615851/an-evaluation-evaluators.html

The citizens in the world of academics are only too aware that there are wheels within wheels. Students, their parents and their teachers know that the path to progress is many tiered.

Students have to imbibe what they are taught, customise their knowledge to cater to the needs of the examination system and then await results post evaluation. The process appears to be ancient, normal and warranted as far as one can see.

The evaluators take over from the point the students finish their examinations, and it is this factor that most students and parents are apprehensive about. Realisation dawns on them that the ball is no longer in their court; their results are in the hands of unknown evaluators especially when they take up the board or university examinations.

The routine of nervously scanning through the Internet and news channels for the forthcoming results can be quite draining to all examinees, no matter to which age group they belong. Though the law of cause and effect is well known to be proportionate, it is apparently not applicable in our desi educational system to a large extent.

It appears that the shloka from the Bhagavad Gita which says, “Karmanye Vaadhika-raste, Maa Phaleshu kadachana,” which means “You have the right only to do your duty, but never anticipate the fruit for your deeds” is applicable to the students who complete their examinations. That is why we find students spending their vacation with fingers crossed for the outcome of their performance.

The anomalies in the realms of examination results can range from appearing late to appearing wrong. Though all boards and universities do have channels for re-totalling, revaluation, availing copies of answer scripts and even provisions to appear in the court of law, the number of mistakes that happen have not come down considerably.

It is understandable that to err is human. After all, it is the teachers who correct answer scripts. It is quite possible that they could have made an error or two out of sheer oversight or fatigue. Considering the fact that they are also willing to recheck and award rightful scores when approached through proper channels also speaks for the fairness and the transparent nature of the system.

All the same, the students find it difficult to repose faith in the system because many of them have been unsuspecting victims of sheer apathy and convoluted processes which have scorched their spirits and singed their opportunities.

Shortage of evaluators

When the matter is scrutinised from the teachers’ point of view, many factors that seem to justify their slipshod job come under the magnifying glass.

Firstly, there is an acute shortage of evaluators. Since most teaching jobs are offered by private educational institutions, they have a floating population of teaching staff.

Teachers resign their jobs at the end of the academic year in search of greener pastures and are sometimes willing to take an unpaid holiday while in the process of switching jobs. This trend automatically shows a large dip in the number of evaluators during the annual academic break.
Teachers who are hired on a contract basis for the occasion try to earn a little extra money by hurrying through the answer scripts.

The teaching faculty with secure jobs usually decides to put up their price during this season and prefers to go on strikes and dharnas. They feel that it is probably the best time to make their presence and value known. The harsh truth is that teachers are the lowest paid educated class in society.

It is a fact that teachers are burdened with the onus of wading through a sea of answer scripts without respite and the remuneration mostly does not match with the effort put in.

Apart from that, the evaluators are answerable to the chief examiner as well as the students if they have bungled in the process of correcting an answer script or totalling the marks obtained. They can be even sued in the court of law for not taking up their responsibility seriously.

The callousness in assessment of students can be averted to a large extent if knowledgeable and conscientious teachers are chosen for the job consciously. In addition, they should be given their due importance, respect and remuneration. They will be only too delighted and diligent to carry out the responsibilities bestowed upon them. And then, the rest assured students can enjoy happy holidays.

Teach Them To Cheat Not


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/605715/teach-them-cheat-not.html

The examination season is on. This year appears to be no different from the examinations conducted over the previous years. It has almost become a habit for most under-performers to try their hands at some hanky-panky.

Students have been caught cheating, warned and even debarred when they have proved themselves to be incorrigible.

Diligent students who have worked hard right round the academic year feel let down when they find themselves being treated on par with some of their classmates who have been promoted as they resorted to copying in examinations.

On the other hand, students who do cheat feel that if they did not risk the malpractice, they would never hear the end of it from their parents besides being looked down upon by their peers and siblings.

Then there are instances of students running away from home and even attempting suicide when caught red handed in the act. When such a case is visualised in proper perspective, it is evident that the squad had meant to check the smooth functioning of the examination entered the room where the errant student was writing the examination, sending a chill down his or her spine resulting in the unfortunate decision of the student.

The copycat who deserves punishment ends up as the hero at the end of the day by sometimes making it to the newspaper headlines. The squad, the principal, the teaching and non-teaching staff are sent on an undeserving guilt trip for simply carrying out their duties sincerely by identifying the malefactor’s blatant blunder.

Then, when the surface of the matter is scratched and deeper introspection is employed, one can see that a lot of invisible hands are involved in doing the dark deed quite unintentionally.

‘Great expectations’
The system and the expectations of the parents, teachers and the peer group are collectively responsible for the immature decision of the wrong doers. Students are pressurised to give their best shot to excel in examinations so that they can emerge as victors in the rat race.

One cannot really discount episodes where the students are led to believe that they could get away with unethical practices.

There are instances where the invigilators actually promise candidates to look the other way for a price when the black deed is being carried out in the examination hall.

There is also a section of candidates who opt to pay for a fake course certificate to university crooks to facilitate their job search.

Compromise in integrity

Compromise in integrity and ethics in the examination happens with unfailing regularity because the educational calibre of a person is determined by the marks obtained by him or her as a student in the board and university examinations.

Personal interest of the student and the core competency for studying the subject appear to be the subject of little or no interest to most of the parents and teachers.

It is a common practice in our country for students scoring high marks to be absorbed in the mainstream or the science stream by the colleges impervious of the fact whether the student has the aptitude for the subject. The cream is expected to opt for professional courses like medical or engineering.

These toppers are the most sought after in the marriage market and job scene, and are regularly placed in the summit of the social ladder.

Those who do not fare well in these examinations are largely doomed for the rest of their lives because they could not prove themselves academically. This practice has almost become a tradition in our educational system much to the chagrin of the students who may have talent and aptitude for other aspects.

It is high time we as a society start respecting the individual’s decision and his/her field of interest. Youngsters should be told that it is important for them to do well in the chosen area no matter what it is.

Innate qualities like honesty, sincerity and sense of purpose should be nurtured in young minds by both parents and teachers to build their moral profile. They should be sensitised to the fact that it is better to fail in honour than to flourish by cheating. Only then can we hope to populate our nation with responsible, dependable and sensible citizens who realise that education is a means to the end and not an end in itself.

With Mind, Heart and Some Hard Work – Learning Sanskrit


http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-edu

Isn’t it sad that Sanskrit has become merely a ‘scoring’ subject? With a little interest, one can not only learn the language well, but also fare better in exams

Preparing for a Sanskrit examination can be very different from studying for examinations of other subjects. The language is exact in terms of phonetics, grammar, and syntax and very vast in terms of literature. The usual methods of learning by rote or trying to stick to important points based on previous years of question papers will actually prove to be detrimental to students. This is one of the reasons why students who usually perform very well in academics fail to make a mark eventually, because they do not score enough in the language paper. This syndrome is true across students of schools, pre-university, undergraduate and post graduate levels. A close observation of the performance levels of students reveals that their marks mostly does not construe to their learning curve. Most students take up Sanskrit, because they are given to understand that their subject will be taught and tested bilingually. In other words, one can answer the Sanskrit paper partially in English or in the vernacular. This facility has been assigned to the study of this language because it is no longer a popular spoken tongue. Students are deprived of a healthy exposure to Sanskrit in their daily lives. Its ancient, immense and precise nature can prove to be a little intimidating to a first time learner. Hence the system considered it fit for the language to be studied through another language. Over a period of time, teachers and students alike have gotten used to the support, to the point of converting it into a crutch of sorts.

It is mandatory to realise that each subject has its own nuance and should be approached with an open mind. Sanskrit is a phonetically accurate language, where we write exactly as we read or speak. Students of Sanskrit, no matter to which age group or class they belong to, will do well to read and write their alphabet all over again. Once the student is thorough with the alphabet, learning to split random words and rejoining them in terms of vowels and consonants will give the learner a deeper understanding of spellings, pronunciation and meanings. In the long run, it will also sensitise the student to the joining and splitting of words.

The next step forward will be to learn declensions of nouns, adjectives and pronouns. This exercise akin to learning multiplication tables in mathematics will make the student realise set patterns of declensions in terms of gender, number, case and the attached prepositions. Similarly when students learn to conjugate verbs in Sanskrit they will become aware of the root forms of verbs, person, number, tense and voice.

Buying a modestly priced Shabda Manjari will prove to be wise investment to a conscientious student. They will do well to practice the same by writing out the declensions and conjugations using different examples and also reading them aloud so that they become familiar with some basic vocabulary. This knowledge in turn will help a pupil to form simple sentences, do translations, and answer questions that follow comprehension passages besides framing basic letters and writing undemanding paragraphs.

Learning to distinguish between declensions, conjugants and indeclinables will set the stage for the learner to become familiar with the art of arriving at participles quite on the lines of forming or balancing a chemical equation. Besides the learner will find it easier to grapple the basics of Sandhi or the joining of words and samasa or the formation of compound words which is peculiar to the language.

Acquiring these fundamental skills will equip the student to not only score appreciable marks in the Sanskrit section but will also prove to be helpful while answering the rest of the paper in English or in the vernacular. Examiners normally appreciate the use of the Devanagari script in answers written in the other lingo especially while using proper nouns, key words, quotations among such others.

If for some reason, a student of Sanskrit has neglected the basics, it is never too late to repair the damage. All it takes is a little interest, time, effort and dedication.

cationplus/with-mind-heart-and-some-hard-work/article17534267.ece

 

Integrity, Not Marks Key to Education


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/553770/integrity-not-marks-key-education.html

A recent survey showed that the number of people fudging their curriculum vitae is on the increase. Police records reveal that there is a whole industry which methodically works on faking documents and certificates.

The earliest stage happens to be leaking of question papers, interfering in the invigilation and evaluation process. If the people who want to cheat have missed the bus in the first phase of deception, they can always avail the services of the underdog by faking their mark sheets and certificates.

Once a candidate is able to pass off his false papers successfully, he is emboldened to try other tricks up his sleeve. He scouts for ways and means to procure an experience certificate and a few other supporting credentials if he can afford it. It is shocking to learn that every year a series of brokers take up board and entrance examinations on behalf of pupils for a price.

Sometimes they also change their names and other identification details legally, to facilitate the recipient and user of the mark sheet, to fudge facts and indulge in fraudulent deals.

Potent trio

The slush that envelops the education scene seems to be getting murkier as each academic year passes by. However, a little introspection will show that the cancer that is eating away at the scene of education has been let loose by the potent trio of parents, teachers and students.

The formidable triumvirate who consider examination scores to be the “be all and the end all” of life need to be counselled on the true intent of education.

There is really no point in producing an army of engineers or management graduates or any other professionals if there is no use for their skills any longer in the job market.

It is sad to note that many of the students who have covetable degrees in socially approved courses possess the potential in a diametrically different area of expertise.

The fact that they have done very well or even decently well in a course that was not after their heart is proof that the graduate is a fairly good and sincere student.

Yet, it is but natural that their performance will amount to being mediocre in the big picture. Finding a dream job or working shoulder to shoulder with people who have the same qualification, acquired with a passion for the subject, will show them in bad light.
The underperformance will undermine the confidence of such workers. Eventually, it will have a bearing on the functioning of the organisation and the county at large.

Contradictory picture
The education scene in India is certainly caught in a series of contradictions. On the one hand, we as a nation lay a very high premium on education. Even the poorest among us dream about educating our children in the hope of seeing them lead a comfortable life sometime in future. Parents are willing to stake their time, energy and money entirely to be able to translate their dreams into reality.

On the other hand, when we find that the academic results of our wards are unsatisfactory or do not rise up to the expectations, we slip into a state of depression. The conundrums that connive to capture us in a web of deceit and dishonesty are the direct result of these doldrums.

Over a period of time, the education sector has been churning out a popular section of pedestrian populace who do not really seem to have delved into the depths of their chosen subject. Lack of expertise in any given field can lead to a dangerous deterioration which can prove to be detrimental to our country’s progress.

It is time to address the canker ensconcing the educational scene. We live in times when even parents of children who are in kindergarten or primary school feel the need to validate their children’s performance to their known circles.

As the child grows up, the pressure increases proportionately. The school, teachers and parents seem to forget the student who is literally at the receiving end of their expectations and egos.

Imagine a scene where everyone will be declared a topper, and where everyone will stand on a level playing field. Consequently, cut throat competition will become more savage, defeating the very purpose of learning.

It is time we accept that abilities and aptitudes vary. It is only when learners are sensitised to the values of integrity and discipline we can progress individually, and as a nation.

Bringing Poetry Alive for Students


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/505075/bringing-poetry-alive-students.html

Radha Prathi, October 8, 2015:

The best efforts of a passionate teacher sometimes leaves a lasting impression of some verses in the minds of students, but it is common knowledge that due to time constraints, the vast syllabus and the pressure of doing well in the more 'important subjects' wean the occasional poetry lover effectively away from the realms of verse.

Over the years, poetry as an aesthetic literary and art form has become the forte of the few people who are genuinely interested in the subject. Of late, it is only the student community which gets to read poetry because it is a part of their syllabus.

Since they “study” poetry, they have been distracted from the joys of enjoying the verses as they are expected to memorise them or peruse the same with the view of answering questions on them in their examinations.

The best efforts of a passionate teacher sometimes leaves a lasting impression of some verses in the minds of students, but it is common knowledge that due to time constraints, the vast syllabus and the pressure of doing well in the more “important subjects” wean the occasional poetry lover effectively away from the realms of verse. It is indeed no wonder, that we have so few poets among our contemporaries and for that matter we do not have as many readers of poetry either.

It is indeed a matter of irony to note that the little kids who were initiated into the world of rhymes when they were tiny tots are now steadily being lead away from the same as they go to higher classes. The pleasure of reciting lines of verse from memory in a singsong way and understanding them at leisure several years later has been the exclusive personal experience of every one of us who has been through the customary educational procedure.

It is a proven fact that poetry has a way of influencing the “mind’s eye” sooner or later when one spends enough time mulling over them at leisure. The verses which work their way into our sub-conscience and have an uncanny way of popping up at times when they are least expected to do so decades after they have been learnt to clear examinations. Such is the power of poetry which has stood the test of time with its universally appealing content.

Today, the scenario has changed, technology has entered the portals of poetry writing, but it is really doubtful whether software assisted poetry writing can match the human effort as the technical version clearly lacks the human touch. The responsibility of evoking the latent poetic spirit in students squarely lies on the educational system.

It is true that our syllabus includes a few quality poems relevant to the age group to be taught in every semester but we must go beyond that. Teachers must be allowed more time to bring out the charm of the age and the work to their young audience.

Competitions in poetry writing, couplet completion, poetry appreciation, translation and recitation should be held in all languages to bring forth the dormant abilities among the budding poets in schools and colleges. The media can be roped in to showcase the bright young minds and encourage them to pursue this august fine art in a large scale at the regional or national level.

If this idea clicks, it will not be long before we find the common man discussing eclectic poetry and in bargain we can look forward to live in a more idyllic society where sensibility and sensitivity hold hands even as the dreamy-eyed smile vaguely when they reminiscence a clever verse laced with poignancy.

Poetry appreciation tips

* Many famous poems and ballads have already been set to music and sometimes have been adapted by theatre and cinema. Students can be encouraged to set music for the poems in their syllabus. Since most poetry in just about any language can be set to tune, a competition of sorts on the subject will elicit the musical quality of poems.

* Mythological, literary, historical allusions among others can be elaborated by narrating stories, which can help the poem to come alive. Watching movies, plays or slideshows on the subject can lead to better understanding.

* Classical poetry indulges in word painting. Good artists can be encouraged to illustrate the idea on hard or soft canvass. Did you know that Raja Ravi Verma drew inspiration for some of his famous paintings from the plays of Kalidasa? n Use of metaphysical wit, archaic language, figures of speech, metrical implications can be discussed with older students

Tips for Studying Effectively


A saying in Sanskrit goes thus, Sukharthinaha Kutho vidhya, Vidhtarthinaha kutho sukham? when translated means that a pleasure seeking person cannot acquire knowledge and a person seeking education cannot even think about pleasure. The saying may sound very harsh but it is very true even in this day and age where the academic capabilities of students are measured by examinations. Each academic year is designed in such a way that each student is expected to gear up for the Annual examination right from his first day of each academic year .The teachers, parents and the students prepare for this mega event collectively throughout the year.

At the school and pre-university level, the teachers of the respective subjects take enough number of revision lessons in each subject to ensure the success of students in the final examination. The teacher has the constraint of catering to the entire class which will consist of students of every genre hence cannot pay attention to the trivialities that contribute to perfection. Hence there are gradations in the student performance. Though every student puts in his or her best they make lapses which affect their percentage. These lapses can be overcome by following a few tips which can surely pave the way for the student to reach the top.

  • Students should frame a tentative time-table for themselves for studying in hours of the early morning which is most conducive for studying.
  • They can first prepare for a subject they are good at so that it gives them a feeling of satisfaction and confidence to proceed with the subjects which are not their hot favourites.
  • They should make it a point to concentrate on one subject at a time so that they get a complete picture of what they are doing.
  • Many students resort to classroom notes and worked out exercises which follow the lesson. This may not be adequate and they should be encouraged to read the lessons from the text book at least once after each revision.
  • Students should avoid memorizing answers for they could be let down badly if their memory fails. On the other hand, if they grapple the concept of the subject they can always put across the answer in their own words.
  • Students can take dictation tests from every subject and perfect their spellings.
  • Poems meant for memorization should be written out a couple of times looking into the text book to grapple the punctuations and spellings.
  • Map work, graph work and diagrams of science should be practised and not glanced through in the last minute for they can easily fetch a student anywhere between five and eight marks when answered accurately.
  • While preparing for mathematics students should be encouraged to work out the prescribed varieties of sums from different text books to help them gain expertise through experience.
  • Group study should be ideally avoided except in the case of mathematics where the students can compete with each other to arrive at the correct answer at the earliest.
  • Students can be encouraged to solve old question papers without omitting any questions by way of choice and get it evaluated by the respective teachers if possible. This exercise will help them revise concepts in different ways.
  • While preparing for the language papers, grammar exercises could be worked out from general grammar books or e-exercises for getting a better insight of the concept.
  • However much a student prepares for an examination certain features of language papers like letter-writing, essay writing, précis writing, paragraph writing, caption writing and comprehension passage are unpredictable. Hence they need to work out sufficiently so that the student does not get put off by the question paper.
  • While preparing at home, it is best that students should use a pencil to write, for it has the twin advantage of not only improving the handwriting but also imbibes a sense of neatness in the student. [The student erases the errors and gets out of the habit of scratching eventually because of getting used to see a scratch free paper].
  • Students should strictly avoid answering avoidable phone calls and entertaining themselves with music or watching television during the study hour for the distraction will adulterate their concentration.

Go ahead and set your score and reach your goal! Best of luck!