Self Confidence Vs Overconfidence


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Confidence can be a powerful virtue and a true friend during times of doubt or crisis. Heroes have overcome obstacles and disasters by the sheer strength of self-reliance. Some admittedly great men who chose to be arrogant paved way for their downfall and defeat.

The Ramayana shows the contrast between the two sides of this wonderful quality through the character of the king of Lanka. Ravana was a staunch devotee of lord Shiva. He wanted to spend all his time in the company of the lord. His royal duties and ambitions came in the way of his deep desire. Therefore he decided to take a middle path that would allow him to have the best of both the worlds. Accordingly, he performed a vigorous penance. When Shiva manifested himself in front of him, he expressed his prayer. Shiva was amused by the naiveté of his devotee who seemed to take him for granted. All the same Shiva did not want to disappoint Ravana. Hence Ravana was given an Atma-Lingam which housed the Soul of Shiva. Even as the king of Lanka reveled at his blessings, and was ready to leave for Lanka, Lord Shiva cautioned him to be careful about handling the Atma Lingam. The lord said that, if the Atma-Lingam was ever placed on the ground during the transit, it would be rooted to the spot. When one observes this clause closely, it will not be difficult to see that Ravana was being tested on two counts – his devotion and determination. Ravana accepted the condition without any hesitation for he saw no threat to breach the stipulation. He proceeded towards Lanka in wind speed.

The gods became apprehensive about the potential power of the already potent king. Ganesha was commissioned to intervene and abort his venture. The elephant god manifested himself as a Brahmin boy and offered to be Ravana’s assistant and hold the Linga while the king completed his ablutions. When Ravana was doing his job, Vinayaka tarried a while, called out to the king and then placed the idol on the ground and vanished. The angered devotee had to garner all his demoniac strength to break off a portion of the Atma Lingam.

If only Ravana had substituted self confidence instead of over confidence he would have been able to retain his hard earned blessings and remained indomitable with all his wonderful talents and qualities.

The Solitary Reapers


https://www.deccanherald.com/opinion/right-in-the-middle/the-solitary-reapers-814761.html

A couple of years ago a small house was rented out in our locale to two women. Within a matter of two weeks, eleven women started living on the premises. The ladies belonged to different age groups, religions and sects. They seemed to be from a neighbouring state. They did not look well off. That explained why they had decided to share one home. The neighbourhood was not exactly pleased with the idea of having such a large population of women amidst their midst. Everyone was on the vigil. After all one needed a concrete evidence to evacuate them from their rented property. However it appeared as if the women were way too decent and busy to take cognizance of the resentment that enveloped them.

There was a total absence of the much expected clamour, chaos and criminal mindset among the ladies. A month passed by. Whenever a maid availed leave, a desperate homemaker would rope in one of the ladies to help her out with her chores. Slowly but surely each one of the women was absorbed as a domestic helper.

They blended seamlessly as indispensable hands in almost every household. Their hardworking and non interfering nature made many of us curious to know more about them. Nevertheless they maintained a stiff upper lip contrary to their tribe.

When we celebrated a festival at our home, we invited the women to offer them the traditional Haldi Kumkum. The women seemed to be taken aback. One of the younger women called me aside and said, “Akka, do not offer us the Haldi Kumkum.” She thumbed out the sacred yellow thread from her blouse furtively and whispered, “All of us are either widows or abandoned women. The yellow thread each one of us wears does what our drunkard husbands did not do; — it protects us from the probing eyes of wicked men. We have come here to work and earn for the upkeep of our families back home. We do not expect anything else. ”

She walked back to her friends who were ready to leave. They reminded me of Wordsworth’s Solitary Reaper. Almost immediately, similar sentimental words from a famous Hindi song came drifted past. “Na main sapna hoon ya koi raaz hoon ek dard bhari awaaz hoon.” ( I am neither a dream nor a secret but a voice filled with melancholy).

I realised that these were worldly wise and independent women who had fenced themselves off intelligently and effectively. I appreciated the way they camouflaged their despair and forged ahead in life and invited them again with renewed fervour.

 

Exploitation will lead to Extinction


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The Koorma Purana chronicles a period when our country was deprived of rainfall for fifteen long years. As a result; our parched land became the face of death. Flora and fauna perished. Human race had even given up the process of disposing their dead, leaving piles of corpses rotting away. Kings and sages were flummoxed out of their wits. Amidst all this chaos and catastrophe, there existed an oasis of peace and prosperity. The wise men of the age conducted the survivors from all strata of society and arrived at the doorstep of sage Gautama. The Good Samaritan welcomed them warmly. He stretched out his resources to feed and clothe the few thousands who had descended on the Ashram. He prayed for some divine intervention to help him keep his refugees comfortable. Goddess Gayathri   manifested herself in front of her magnanimous devotee and presented him with a Kamandalu   (a water jug with a handle and spout) that was capable of providing the famished hordes their requirements. The distraught refugees who were replenished with their essentials celebrated their host’s hospitality. Although everyone was satiated, jealousy raised her ugly head in the minds of the sages who considered themselves as peers of Gautama Rishi. The envious lot got together and led a cow which was merely skin and bones to the altar of Gautama’s Yajna. The compassionate Gautama got up to lead the bovine to some water. Even as he touched the animal’s face, she collapsed and fell dead. The sages who were waiting to pin the grotesque sin of killing a cow on sage Gautama lost no time to censure him and lead him on a guilt trip. When Gautama recovered from the shock, he was able to see through the devious plot. He declared that it was shameful for the accursed to claim Vedic knowledge when they did not know the basic values of life like truth and compassion.

It is apparent that the drought was a result of mindless living which took toll of the balance in nature. When the victims were provided unconditional support despite their folly, they responded with heartless ingratitude. It is no wonder they were ostracized for their knowledge for it served them no purpose. If we pursue the path of exploitation of fellow living beings and the environment around us we cannot hope to escape extinction.

Quest for Perfect Happiness


Published in today’s Deccan Herald

The quest for perfect happiness is as old as mankind itself. It is interesting to note that an ancient text like the Bhagavata   Purana offers a formula to arrive at the solution through the story of Puranjana narrated by sage Narada to king Prachinabarhi. The young, handsome and energetic hero of the tale ventures out in search glory, riches and happiness. He comes across a wonderful land with nine gates punctuated with splendour and class. Puranjana is enticed into this magical territory. There he finds an extremely beautiful woman guarded by a serpent with five hoods, ten body guards and one thousand aides. Puranjana is besotted by the damsel, marries her with her consent a decadent life in the Golden City. One day he set out for hunting on his chariot drawn by five horses. He is attacked, tormented  and struck dead.

Since his thoughts revolved around his lovely wife, in his dying moments, he is reborn as a woman. In his next cycle of life he leads the life of a chaste wife and is eventually widowed. It is only at the end of that life, he is enlightened with the truth.

Narada reveals that the story of Puranjana happens to be a metaphor. The word Pura refers to the human body likened to a striking city full of life. The nine gates refer to the openings in the body which help it to learn, entertain and cleanse itself. The various embellishments of the place actually refer to the clothes accessories, attitude, behaviour and parts of the body. The wondrous woman happens to be the human mind which is guarded by the hissing Pancha Pranas and the sense organs and their faculties. When man feels compelled to hunt for greater pleasures, he is led by the senses which are represented by the five horses harnessed to his chariot. He eventually loses his life.

In the next birth he is endowed with some fine qualities of womanhood like loyalty, sacrifice and infinite affection which complements his personality and endows his being a sense of wholesomeness.

The story of Puranjana is a metaphor used to put across that when man allows his mind to rule over him instead of controlling his senses he ends up being its slave. This weakness makes him stray. He loses touch with himself and begins to live in a fool’s paradise. When he does wake up from the reverie, it might be too late for him to pursue genuine happiness.

QUEST FOR PERFECT HAPPINESS

By S. RADHA PRATHI

The quest for perfect happiness is as old as mankind itself. It is interesting to note that an ancient text like the Bhagavata   Purana offers a formula to arrive at the solution through the story of Puranjana narrated by sage Narada to king Prachinabarhi. The young, handsome and energetic hero of the tale ventures out in search glory, riches and happiness. He comes across a wonderful land with nine gates punctuated with splendour and class. Puranjana is enticed into this magical territory. There he finds an extremely beautiful woman guarded by a serpent with five hoods, ten body guards and one thousand aides. Puranjana is besotted by the damsel, marries her with her consent a decadent life in the Golden City. One day he set out for hunting on his chariot drawn by five horses. He is attacked, tormented  and struck dead.

Since his thoughts revolved around his lovely wife, in his dying moments, he is reborn as a woman. In his next cycle of life he leads the life of a chaste wife and is eventually widowed. It is only at the end of that life, he is enlightened with the truth.

Narada reveals that the story of Puranjana happens to be a metaphor. The word Pura refers to the human body likened to a striking city full of life. The nine gates refer to the openings in the body which help it to learn, entertain and cleanse itself. The various embellishments of the place actually refer to the clothes accessories, attitude, behaviour and parts of the body. The wondrous woman happens to be the human mind which is guarded by the hissing Pancha Pranas and the sense organs and their faculties. When man feels compelled to hunt for greater pleasures, he is led by the senses which are represented by the five horses harnessed to his chariot. He eventually loses his life.

In the next birth he is endowed with some fine qualities of womanhood like loyalty, sacrifice and infinite affection which complements his personality and endows his being a sense of wholesomeness.

The story of Puranjana is a metaphor used to put across that when man allows his mind to rule over him instead of controlling his senses he ends up being its slave. This weakness makes him stray. He loses touch with himself and begins to live in a fool’s paradise. When he does wake up from the reverie, it might be too late for him to pursue genuine happiness.

Five-fold Formula For Success


https://www.deccanherald.com/opinion/oasis/defining-indian-management-788726.html

Which of us would not like to succeed and enjoy our name, fame, money and the status that comes along with it? The desire is but only natural and perfectly legitimate as long as we do not swerve from the path of truth and take to undesirable methods to achieve our goals. True, it is a tough proposition and sometimes it becomes very tempting for us to take up shortcuts to success. If we are under the impression that the said syndrome is the weakness of the human race alone, we must stand corrected.

The Markandeya Purana records a discord among the trinities on this count. Once it so happened that MahaVishnu and Brahma got into an unexpected argument. Each of them felt he was superior to the other. Shiva who was a witness to this altercation offered to find a solution to this issue. Accordingly, he metamorphosed into a linear flame and instructed the two discontented gods to find his beginning and the end. Brahma turned himself into a swan and flew upwards. Maha Vishnu bored into the bowels of the earth in the form of a tusked boar. Though both of them began zealously in right earnest, they were unable to reach their destination. After a considerable amount of effort and time, the two of them returned. Brahma said he had seen the tip of the Shiva Linga and handed over a Ketaki flower to lord Shiva saying that he found it on top of the Linga. MahaVishnu gracefully conceded that he could not fulfill his task.

Even as Brahma braced himself to be accolade for his achievement, lord Shiva pronounced a curse on the creator saying that he will not be included for idol worship on earth. He also vowed that he would not accept the Ketaki flower in his worship.

This tale holds a fivefold message that can be guiding forces to help us lead a successful life. We must steer clear of the one-upmanship game. Honesty is the best policy. There is no shame in accepting our shortcomings or failure. Faked success can burst like a bubble at any time and damage our self esteem and our image forever. The expanse of any subject is infinite like the supreme soul Shiva; we can explore it to the best of our ability but never gain complete access over it.

The Osmosis of Life


Published in Today’s Deccan Herald

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How often have we been told that God is One. It does not really matter which religion we profess, because ultimately we hope to realize the Truth that has the world functioning the way it is. Every religion aims at establishing peace and harmony in the universe using the same key ingredients. All streams of theology swear by the power of truth and compassion and urges man to become better than himself morally to attain spiritual fulfillment.

The Keshava Smrithi, clearly states that, just like rain water reaches the sea one way or another, so also the obeisance rendered to various gods reach Keshava. In other words, the import of the Shloka highlights the fact that there is only one God, no matter what we call him. While comparing prayers to rain water, the couplet gently points out the scientific principle of how the waters of the oceans evaporate, form clouds and precipitate as rains. The rain in turn contributes to the various water bodies on earth eventually flows back to the sea. So also, we could be worshipping the supreme power in many different ways. Yet the spirit of prayer, the intensity of faith and the awe we have for the almighty is the same. If our appeals are fervent and sincere we do not have to worry about the method for our prayers will surely be answered in one way or another.

When we analyze the idea pragmatically, it still makes sense. We know that water finds its own level. The concept of osmosis has proved the theory of equalization. Water helps life of all genres to emerge, evolve and sustain no matter how large, deep or pure it may be.

It is interesting to note that the very practical osmotic process has a very lofty philosophical connotation. If people understand that the underlying principle of every way of life is essentially the same, we can thrive in an integrated way despite the vast diversity.

 

 

Facing Rain Challenges


Published in the Student Editon of Deccan Herald

We have been having erratic spells of rains this year. It is pouring cats and dogs at times, flooding our streets and sometimes our homes. And then as in all things the side effects follow. First of all there is a cut in electricity supply, elsewhere surging currents cause short circuits. Then old trees fall, sometimes old buildings give way. Storm water drains overflow, sewage pipes clog, potholes open up further causing incidental accidents. Television channels repetitively show gushing waters throwing entire cities, towns, villages, fields and roads out of gear even as the common man strives to get back to normalcy. Once the rains subside and the waters recede, illnesses take toll of men and animals alike. Mosquitoes breed and add to the chaos. These events have become a regular feature for a couple of years now. All the modern technology and scientific knowhow wring their hands helplessly, unable to help us out of the mess.

That was a verbal description of what all of us in the subcontinent are aware of. The reason why it has been narrated here is to help us understand the problem and find a permanent solution for it.

It is apparent that we are one too many people sharing space and amenities. All the same we cannot reduce the population immediately. The shared amenities can be multiplied, but that will also take time. There is hardly any space through which mother earth can absorb the rain waters to replenish her water table, but rainwater harvesting is quite an exercise and can be best done only in summer. Old buildings and roads can be repaired, but cannot be done right now. So you might be wondering what could be the point in discussing about things which cannot provide immediate relief.

For those of you who do not know it already, here is the story of the ant and the grasshopper. The two friends could not really see eye to eye about playtime. The grasshopper wanted to enjoy his summer to the maximum possible extent while the ant wanted to collect food and store them for a rainy day. Since the two of them agreed to disagree they went about doing their own thing. The grasshopper enjoyed himself thoroughly. The ant on the other hand scouted for food, picked it up and carried it to his nest. Soon summer flit past. It started to drizzle and gained momentum as heavy rains in the coming months. The two insects had nothing to do except stay back at home. While the ant and his extended family helped themselves to the stored food, the grasshopper almost died of starvation. There is a strong message in this story for those of us who care to identify it.

Spells of rain can cast a magical spell on our earth and evoke the poets in us. On the other hand rains can spell hell on earth especially in overcrowded and unplanned urban space. It appears that the rainy seasons of the past years have not taught us much, because we have still not been able to overcome the sudden chaos that is turned loose on us once the skies decide to open up. The reason for this is we have been behaving like grasshoppers hoping to cross bridges as and when we come across them. It is high time we start behaving like the ant and prepare ourselves for a rainy day. We can look around our homes, office and school spaces and make a list of all the things that need to be set right. Then we must start working on it at the earliest opportunity both individually and collectively. It is only then we can live peacefully and enjoy the rains at least next year!