Quest for Perfect Happiness


Published in today’s Deccan Herald

The quest for perfect happiness is as old as mankind itself. It is interesting to note that an ancient text like the Bhagavata   Purana offers a formula to arrive at the solution through the story of Puranjana narrated by sage Narada to king Prachinabarhi. The young, handsome and energetic hero of the tale ventures out in search glory, riches and happiness. He comes across a wonderful land with nine gates punctuated with splendour and class. Puranjana is enticed into this magical territory. There he finds an extremely beautiful woman guarded by a serpent with five hoods, ten body guards and one thousand aides. Puranjana is besotted by the damsel, marries her with her consent a decadent life in the Golden City. One day he set out for hunting on his chariot drawn by five horses. He is attacked, tormented  and struck dead.

Since his thoughts revolved around his lovely wife, in his dying moments, he is reborn as a woman. In his next cycle of life he leads the life of a chaste wife and is eventually widowed. It is only at the end of that life, he is enlightened with the truth.

Narada reveals that the story of Puranjana happens to be a metaphor. The word Pura refers to the human body likened to a striking city full of life. The nine gates refer to the openings in the body which help it to learn, entertain and cleanse itself. The various embellishments of the place actually refer to the clothes accessories, attitude, behaviour and parts of the body. The wondrous woman happens to be the human mind which is guarded by the hissing Pancha Pranas and the sense organs and their faculties. When man feels compelled to hunt for greater pleasures, he is led by the senses which are represented by the five horses harnessed to his chariot. He eventually loses his life.

In the next birth he is endowed with some fine qualities of womanhood like loyalty, sacrifice and infinite affection which complements his personality and endows his being a sense of wholesomeness.

The story of Puranjana is a metaphor used to put across that when man allows his mind to rule over him instead of controlling his senses he ends up being its slave. This weakness makes him stray. He loses touch with himself and begins to live in a fool’s paradise. When he does wake up from the reverie, it might be too late for him to pursue genuine happiness.

QUEST FOR PERFECT HAPPINESS

By S. RADHA PRATHI

The quest for perfect happiness is as old as mankind itself. It is interesting to note that an ancient text like the Bhagavata   Purana offers a formula to arrive at the solution through the story of Puranjana narrated by sage Narada to king Prachinabarhi. The young, handsome and energetic hero of the tale ventures out in search glory, riches and happiness. He comes across a wonderful land with nine gates punctuated with splendour and class. Puranjana is enticed into this magical territory. There he finds an extremely beautiful woman guarded by a serpent with five hoods, ten body guards and one thousand aides. Puranjana is besotted by the damsel, marries her with her consent a decadent life in the Golden City. One day he set out for hunting on his chariot drawn by five horses. He is attacked, tormented  and struck dead.

Since his thoughts revolved around his lovely wife, in his dying moments, he is reborn as a woman. In his next cycle of life he leads the life of a chaste wife and is eventually widowed. It is only at the end of that life, he is enlightened with the truth.

Narada reveals that the story of Puranjana happens to be a metaphor. The word Pura refers to the human body likened to a striking city full of life. The nine gates refer to the openings in the body which help it to learn, entertain and cleanse itself. The various embellishments of the place actually refer to the clothes accessories, attitude, behaviour and parts of the body. The wondrous woman happens to be the human mind which is guarded by the hissing Pancha Pranas and the sense organs and their faculties. When man feels compelled to hunt for greater pleasures, he is led by the senses which are represented by the five horses harnessed to his chariot. He eventually loses his life.

In the next birth he is endowed with some fine qualities of womanhood like loyalty, sacrifice and infinite affection which complements his personality and endows his being a sense of wholesomeness.

The story of Puranjana is a metaphor used to put across that when man allows his mind to rule over him instead of controlling his senses he ends up being its slave. This weakness makes him stray. He loses touch with himself and begins to live in a fool’s paradise. When he does wake up from the reverie, it might be too late for him to pursue genuine happiness.

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