Dignity Of Labour


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Each one of us would like to lead a life of luxury. If that is not possible we at least crave for a life of comforts. There is nothing wrong in wishing so! Yet the fact remains that, not everyone can land a white-collared job.

All the same, let us imagine that the wishful thinking of our collective conscience is translated into reality by the universe. The world would be chaotic. Who will grow the food for us? Who will tailor our clothes for us and clean up after us? You must have got the drift by now. We are a close-knit world where each one of us contributes directly or indirectly to the well being of another. Such being the case, it will be ridiculous for us to assume that one job is superior to another in terms of importance. If everyone does their job conscientiously and earnestly, not only will the world be a better place, we can march ahead of time.

The Ramayana, Mahabharata and the Puranas record the life story of king Harishchandra who was known for his impeccable integrity and his unswerving principle to honour his promise at any cost.

The king of Ayodhya unwittingly got into a situation where he was obliged to pay an astronomical amount of gold to sage Vishwamitra. All the wealth in his treasury could not redeem his promise.

Though the sage tauntingly told the ruler that he was ready to negate the amount, Harishchandra would not hear of it. He gave up his kingdom to pay the price of the capital amount. He still owed the dakshina to Vishwamitra. The king decided to work off the loan. Since the sage had no use for him, he sold his wife and son to a Brahmin as slaves and paid part of the amount. Then the sovereign sold himself to a grave keeper and took up the life of a Chandala in right earnest just in order to honour his promise.

The ability of the king not to stand on formality and take up his diversely varied roles seriously speaks about the importance of dignity of labour. That Harishchandra underwent harsher travails to prove his worth is another story.

Go with the flow of Life


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/596151/go-flow-life.html

Life is certainly stranger than fiction. Yet if we decide to go with the flow of life after overcoming the initial shock, it will not only make life easier for us, but will also make life more bearable to our loved ones.

Sage Dhaumya narrates the story of Maharishi Chyavana and his spouse Sukanya to the exiled Pandavas and their consort Draupadi to help them understand the unpredictable aspects of life. Once, king Sharyathi went on a picnic with his royal family. Sukanya, the young princess wandered away from the group. She was attracted to an anthill. When she got closer, she noticed two shiny spots which seemed to be within the ant hill.

The little lass felt tempted to tease out the glittery worms from their position. She scouted for a long sharp twig and began digging into the spot. What began as a fun exercise, horrified her as she noticed blood oozing out from the anthill, punctuated with agonizing cry of a human being.

The royal family rallied around her after they heard her hysterical shrieks. The king immediately knocked off chunks of the anthill steadily and gently. He was shaken when he saw an old and wizened sage bleeding in the eyes. Young Sukanya realised that she had inadvertently poked the gleaming eyes of sage, mistaking them to be glow worms.

The king and his entourage apologised profusely. The king offered his daughter Sukanya in marriage to the sage to make amends for the damage rendered to his eyes. The princess had no choice but to accept the blind sage as her groom to assuage her guilt and also to uphold her father’s respectability.

Though Sukanya’s marital life began as a compromise over bizarre inequalities, she accepted her new station in life. She took her role as the dutiful and loving wife seriously. She surmounted many more trials, but that is another story. Her intrinsic values and determination to make the best out of the given situation transformed her into a worthy role model. Life sometimes has the penchant to take us through unimaginable paths. At such times it will be in our best interests to remember that if life gives us a lemon, we must make lemonade out of it!

Memory Vs Photographs


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Even as I saw the zillionth person clicking pictures or selfies and sharing them relentlessly, I inadvertently stepped into my personal realm of nostalgia. I remember that we did the most enjoyable things around our homes and with our families, but they were rarely photographed. Every evening, my metre-long tresses would be braided into a plait, and a tassel (kuchchu) would mark the end of it.

Long strings of jasmine buds would be woven around it. Once, a special day was earmarked for me to wear a moggina jade (a readymade pad with jasmine buds and an occasional rose fit on the back of the head and the plait). This red-lettered day was preceded by elaborate preparations.

My mom sourced fresh mehendi leaves, ground them into a fine paste, and applied it on my palms and feet before the event. The following morning, I was given a traditional oil bath and the fumes of frankincense were waved over my drying hair to perfume it. Then, I wore the traditional silk skirt, some pieces of antique jewellery, and got ready to get my hair braided and wear moggina jade. After receiving glowing compliments from all our guests, I was relieved of the same with equal care. I thoroughly enjoyed the exercise while it lasted, and have ruminated on it many times over.

As the years rolled by, I used to feel a little vexed with my parents for not having photographed me in my moment of crowning glory. I would be tersely told that the enjoyment was the reward, while photographing it would have amounted to merely documenting it. Their explanation used to irk me all the more because it sounded like a lame excuse for not having thought of it.

I entertained uncharitable thoughts about their miserliness until one day, when a family friend began showing us her holiday album.

The pictures were glossy and beautiful, but the smiling lady who was ever-present in all of them had little memory of the place or its distinction, or even the names of the other members of the group, because she was always grooming herself to look good in the shots.

It was then that I understood the meaning of what I had been told. A photograph of my long braid would have merely retained the visual. I might have been happy and proud of the picture, but might have relegated it to an album and put it away safely.

However, the fact that it was not photographed possibly preserved the memory of the smells and sounds associated with the event.

Surprisingly, quite a few of them who had seen me enjoying my moment in the sun also seem to remember it quite well, and have since shared it with their spouses and children.

It happened long ago. Few people wielded the camera then. Yet, special moments of the privileged were captured on camera. Since they were far and few, they attained the status of precious family and national heirlooms. Today, technology has made photographing a cake walk. However, we must remember that if we spend all the time behind the lens, we may not have memories attached to them when we look at them at a later date. Let us not miss the woods for the trees.

Go with the Flow of Life


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/596151/go-flow-life.html

Life is certainly stranger than fiction. Yet if we decide to go with the flow of life after overcoming the initial shock, it will not only make life easier for us, but will also make life more bearable to our loved ones.

Sage Dhaumya narrates the story of Maharishi Chyavana and his spouse Sukanya to the exiled Pandavas and their consort Draupadi to help them understand the unpredictable aspects of life. Once, king Sharyathi went on a picnic with his royal family. Sukanya, the young princess wandered away from the group. She was attracted to an anthill. When she got closer, she noticed two shiny spots which seemed to be within the ant hill.

The little lass felt tempted to tease out the glittery worms from their position. She scouted for a long sharp twig and began digging into the spot. What began as a fun exercise, horrified her as she noticed blood oozing out from the anthill, punctuated with agonizing cry of a human being.

The royal family rallied around her after they heard her hysterical shrieks. The king immediately knocked off chunks of the anthill steadily and gently. He was shaken when he saw an old and wizened sage bleeding in the eyes. Young Sukanya realised that she had inadvertently poked the gleaming eyes of sage, mistaking them to be glow worms.

The king and his entourage apologised profusely. The king offered his daughter Sukanya in marriage to the sage to make amends for the damage rendered to his eyes. The princess had no choice but to accept the blind sage as her groom to assuage her guilt and also to uphold her father’s respectability.

Though Sukanya’s marital life began as a compromise over bizarre inequalities, she accepted her new station in life. She took her role as the dutiful and loving wife seriously. She surmounted many more trials, but that is another story. Her intrinsic values and determination to make the best out of the given situation transformed her into a worthy role model. Life sometimes has the penchant to take us through unimaginable paths. At such times it will be in our best interests to remember that if life gives us a lemon, we must make lemonade out of it!

Testing time For Trees


http://www.deccanherald.com/content/594149/testing-times-trees.html

 

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How does one kill a tree? Axe it down silly! I can almost hear you screaming out loudly. But then, we also know that the old fogey will shed tears for a while, mope around a bit and spring right back with tender green sprouts at the earliest opportunity.

So, if someone wants to get rid of the tree forever, they must ensure that the roots are pulled out entirely and they are denied access to moisture because they can battle back to survival with the least of resources.

Man learned to do this job meticulously because he did not want impediments in the form of trees on his road to progress. Never mind, if he destroyed the green cover, he could always cross bridges as and when he came across them. Well, what has been outlined is a well known old story.

These days, the green activists, the government, its opposition party and the common man are in agreement about the importance of growing and nurturing trees for our own sakes. This wisdom has dawned across mankind around the world after mother nature has given us a sample of how climate change and depleting natural resources can actually spell disaster to us in the long-run.

So, If we are under the impression that we have turned into Samaritans who will squirm at the very thought of bringing down sturdy trees, we must stand corrected. We have simply changed our excuses to do the dreadful deed.

These days we bring down the old fellows who are threatening to fall down during the next rains. This measure has the sanctified permission of the powers that be and is carried out in full public view in broad daylight.

Inhuman way
However, this piece aims at throwing light on several other inhuman ways which are being employed to do away with the green shade. How many times have we not noticed a lot of garbage, mostly the inflammable variety being dumped around a tree?

They are regularly burnt down till the tree gets browner by the day; even as its life supporting roots are singed to death. When the tree starts resembling deadwood, they become officially ready to be brought down with official sanction. It is strange but true, that this modus operandi has been almost uniformly adopted by urban India.

Materialistic instincts

It is also a fact that these trees are invariably the ones that are found on the pavements or properties that have been earmarked to serve a greater commercial purpose driven by the materialistic instincts of the perpetrator/s.

All the same, these days, the eco-friendly lot occasionally smells a rat and bung a spanner in the destructive project. Nevertheless, there are people who are ready to go to any length to eliminate the obstacles that come in their way of their growth.

More recently a bunch of diehard tree lovers were shocked out of their wits to see a whole copse die and fall down. When the area was marked to be developed as a commercial complex, the builders wanted to get a better look at the ground and ordered the trees to be cleared.

The tree enthusiasts managed to convince the owner to retain the trees and even came up with a less lucrative plan B which would prove to be a green service to the society at large.

The matter did seem to conclude amicably and seemed to be that way for almost a year, till the day when all the trees came crashing down within a matter of a few days. A little investigation by the heartbroken group revealed that small dozes cups of poison had been dropped around the roots of the trees, one foot below the ground level. When they shared this bit of tragic news, it became apparent that this dirty secret happened to be the cause of death of many such random trees that came down across time and space.

Once the initial distaste for the morbid thought process ceases, one must realise that people will always be on either side of the fence when it comes to their equations with nature’s verdant bounty.

Therefore, it becomes the solemn duty of the champions of the cause of trees to watch out and foil the clever, furtive and sly attempts of their detractors. If we choose to be passive onlookers of the massive annihilation of our green cover, we may not even have enough time for retribution.